Undergraduate Course List (Rural Sociology)

First Year 1st Semester

Course Title: Functional Mathematics - I
Course Code: MATH-301
Course Credit Hours: 3(3+0)
Prerequisites: None

Matrices: Introduction to matrices, types, matrix inverse, determinants, system of linear equations, Cramer’s rule.
Quadratic Equations: Solution of quadratic equations, qualitative analysis of roots of a quadratic equations, equations reducible to quadratic equations, cube roots of unity, relation between roots and coefficients of quadratic equations.
Sequences and series: Arithmetic progression, geometric progression, harmonic progression.
Binomial Theorem: Introduction to mathematical induction, binomial theorem with rational and irrational indices.
Integration and Definite Integrals: Techniques of evaluating indefinite integrals. Integration by substitution, integration by parts, change of variable in indefinite integrals.
Derivatives and their Applications: Differentiable of polynomial, rational and transcendental functions, derivatives.
Trigonometry: Fundamentals of trigonometry, trigonometric identities.
Geometry in Two Dimensions: Cartesian-coordinate mesh, slope of a line, equation of line, parallel and perpendicular lines, angle between two lines, distance between two points and a line.
Conic Section: Circle, Equation of a circle, Parabola, Equation of Parabola, ellipse, Equation of Ellipse, hyperbola, the equation of Hyperbola.

Text Books

  1. Dolciani MP, Wooton W. Beckenback EF, Sharron S. Algebra 2 and Trigonometry, 1978. Houghton & Mifflin, boston (Suggested Text).
  2. Kaufmann JE, College Algebra and Trigonometry. 1987. PWS-Kent Company, Boston.
  3. Anton H, Bevens I, Davis S, Calculus: A New Horizon (8th edition), 2005. John Wiley, New York.
  4. Swokowski EW, Fundamentals of Algebra and Trigonometry (6th edition), 1986, PWS-Kent Company Boston.
  5. Thomas GB, Finney AR, Calculus (11th edition), 2005, Addison-Wesley, Reading, Ma, USA.
  6. Abraham S, Analytic Geometry, Scott, Freshman and Company, 1969.

Course Title: Introduction to Soil Science
Course Code: SS-301
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Objectives and Learning Outcome

This course introduces the concepts of soil science for agriculture students at under-graduate level. The students will be able to understand soil properties and their relationship with crop production and environment.

Course Contents

  1. Definition of earth, geology and soil science; Disciplines of soil science
  2. Factors and processes of soil formation
  3. Soil forming rocks and minerals and types of parent material
  4. Soil profile description
  5. Physical, chemical and biological properties of soil
  6. Soil classification and land use capability classes
  7. Soil organic matter: Sources, composition and decomposition
  8. Soil Fertility: Essential plant nutrients, organic and inorganic sources
  9. Salt-affected and waterlogged soils
  10. Soil and water conservation
  11. Soil and water pollution

Practical

  1. Soil sampling and handling
  2. Preparation of saturated soil paste and measurement of pHs and ECe
  3. Determination of soil water contents
  4. Determination of bulk density and total porosity
  5. Soil texture: feel and hydrometer methods
  6. Irrigation water analysis and interpretation
  7. Identification and calculation of nutrient percentage from fertilizer
  8. Determination of soil organic matter

Recommanded Books

  1. Bashir, E. and R. Bantel. 2001. Soil Science. National Book Foundation, Islamabad, Pakistan.
  2. Brady, N.C. and R.R. Weil. 2007. The Nature and Properties of Soils. 14th Ed. Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA.
  3. Brady, N.C. and R.R. Weil. 2009. Elements of the Nature and Properties of Soils. 3rd Ed. Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA.
  4. Das, D.K. 2011. Introductory Soil Science. 3rd ed. Kalyani Publ. New Delhi-110002, India
  5. Hillel, D. 2008. Soil in the Environment: Crucible of Terrestrial Life. Elsevier Inc., Burlington, MA, USA. Singer, M.J. and D.N. Munns. 2002. Soils- An Introduction. 5th Ed. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA.

Course Title: Basic Agriculture
Course Code: AGR-301
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Objectives

To provide the basic knowledge and background about Pakistan’s Agriculture.

Theory

Agriculture, concept, history and importance; Branches and allied sciences in agriculture; Salient features and problems of Pakistan’s agriculture; Climate, weather and seasons of Pakistan, their major characteristics and impact on crop production; Land resources and their utilization; Crop nutrition; Water resources, surface and ground water, canal system; Agro –ecological zones of Pakistan; Farming system; Agro-based industries.

Practical

Land measuring units; Demonstration of hand tools and tillage implements; Identification of meteorological instruments; Identification of crop plant, weeds and seeds; Identification of organic and inorganic fertilizers; Calculation of nutrient-cum-fertilizer unit value; Demonstration of various irrigation methods; Field visits.

Recommanded Books

  1. Abbas, M.A. 2006. General Agriculture. Emporium Urdu Bazar, Lahore.
  2. Balasubramaniyan, 2004. Principles and Practices of Agronomy. Agrobios, Jodhpur, India.
  3. Khalil, I.A. and Jan. 2002. Cropping Technology. National Book Foundation, Islamabad.
  4. Khan S.R.A. 2001. Crop Management in Pakistan with Focus on Soil and Water. Directorate of Agricultural Information, Punjab, Lahore.
  5. Nazir, M.S., E. Bashir and R. Bantel. (Eds.) 1994. Crop Production. National Book Foundation, Islamabad.
  6. Qureshi, M.A. M.A. Zia and M.S. Qureshi. 2006. Pakistan Agriculture Management and Development. A-One Publisher, Urdu Bazar, Lahore.

Course Title: Introductory Entomology
Course Code: ENT-301
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Learning outcomes

The students would be able to:

  1. Know about arthropods and especially insects with their morphological features
  2. Identify insects of economic importance and acquire working skills for collecting, mounting, and preserving insects.

Theory

Introduction; phylum Arthropoda and its classification; morphology, anatomy and physiology of a typical insects, metamorphosis and its types; insect classification, salient characters of insect orders; examples from major families of economic importance.

Practical

Characters of classes of Arthropoda; collection and preservation of insects; morphology and dissection of a typical insect (digestive, reproductive, excretory, nervous, circulatory and tracheal systems); temporary mounts of different types of appendages of insects.; Observations for types of metamorphosis.

Recommanded Books

  1. Ahmad, I. 2010. Hashriat “Insects”, National Book Foundation, Lahore.
  2. Awastheir, V.B. 2009, Introduction to General and Applied Entomology, Scientific Publisher, Jodhpur, India.
  3. Dhaliwal, G.S. 2007. An Outline of Entomology, Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana.
  4. Elzinga, R.J. 2003. Fundamentals of Entomology, Prentice Hall.
  5. Gullan, P.J. and P.S. Cranston. 2010. The insects: An Outline of Entomology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell, A. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Publication, U.K.
  6. Lohar, M.K. 2001. Introductory Entomology, Department of Entomology, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Sindh, Pakistan.
  7. Richards, O.W. and Davies, R.G. 2004. Imm’s General Tex-book of Entomology, Vol.I, and II, 10th Ed. Chapman & Hall, London, N.Y.
  8. Romoser, W.S. and Stoffolano, J.G. 1998. The Science of Entomology, WCB McGraw Hill.
  9. Triplenhorn, C.A. and Jhonson, N.F. 2005. Borror and Delong’s Introduction to the study of Insects. Brooks Cole. 7th Ed.
  10. Trigumayat, M.M. 2009. A Manual of Practical Entomology. 2nd Edition Scientific Publisher (India) Judhpur.
  11. Yousuf, M. Tayyab, M. and Shazia, Y. 2007. Manual of Introductory Entomology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad.
  12. Pedigo, L.P. and Marlin, E.R. 2009. Entomology and Pest Management, 6th edition. Person Education Inc., Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458, U.S.A.

Course Title: English Text Grammar & Composition
Course Code: ENG-301
Course Credit Hours: 2(2+0)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Basic of Grammar, Parts of speech and use of articles. Sentence structure, active and passive, voice, practice in unified sentence, Analysis of phrase, clause and sentence structure, Transitive and intransitive verbs, Punctuation and spelling.

Comprehension: Answer to questions on a given text.
Discussion: General topics and every-day conversation (topics for discussion to be at the discretion of the teacher keeping in view the level of students).
ListeningTo be improved by showing documentaries carefully selected by subject teachers.
Translation skills
Paragraph writing: Topics to be chosen at the discretion of the teacher
Presentation skills: Introduction

Recommanded Books

  1. Practical English Grammar by A.J. Thomson and A.V. Martinet. Exercise 1. Third edition, Oxford University Pres. 1997. ISBN 0194313492.
  2. Practical English Grammar by A.J. Thomson and A.V. Martinet. Exercises 2. Third edition, Oxford University Pres. 1997. ISBN 0194313506.
  3. Writing. Intermediate by Marie-Christine Boutin, Suzanne Brinand and Francoise Grellet. Oxford Supplementary Skills. Fourth Impression 1993. ISBN 0194354057 Pages 20-27 and 35-41.
  4. Reading. Upper Intermediate. Brain Tomlinson and Rod Ellis. Oxford Supplementary Skills. Third Impression 1992. ISBN 019453402 2.

Course Title: Introduction to Agriculture Education Extension
Course Code: AEE-301
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

The historical review of Agricultural Education Extension; The concept, meaning, principles, and objectives of Agril. Education Extension; Role of Agril. Education Extension in Rural development; Role of Extension worker in Agril. Development; Approaches to Agril. Education Extension; Nature of Agril. Education Extension; Role of teacher/local leader; Importance of women in Rural development; Contribution of Agril. Education Extension and deficiencies in the present Extension system; Introduction to Extension System in Pakistan; Extension teaching methods; Motivation.

Practical

class; field trip, farm visits, collection of data; interview from different organizations involved in rural development; Report writing, presentation; preparation of organizational charts.

Recommanded Books

  1. E. Bashir (Ed.) Extension Methods; National Book Foundation, Islamabad.
  2. FAO Manual. Improving Agricultural Extension in Development Countries. FAO, Rome.

Course Title: Islamic Studies / Ethical Behavior
Course Code: IS/EB-301
Course Credit Hours: 2(2+0)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Introduction to Quranic Studies: Basic concepts of Quran, History of Quran, Uloom-ul-Quran.
Study of Selected Text of Holly Quran: Verses of Surah Al-Baqra related to Faith (Verse No-284-286), Verses of Surah Al-Hujrat related to Adab Al-Nabi (Verse No. 1-18), Verse of Surah Al-Mumanoon related to characteristics of faithful (Verse No. 1-11), Verse of Surah l-Furqan related to Social Ethics (Verse No. 63-77), Verses of Surah Al-Inam related to Ihkam (Verse No. 152-154).
Introduction to Quranic Studies: Basic concepts of Quran, History of Quran, Uloom-ul-Quran.
Study of Selected Text of Holly Quran: Verses of Surah Al-Ihzab related to Adab Al-Nabi (Verse No. 6,21,40,56,57,58), Verses of Surah Al-Hashar (18,19,20) related to thinking, Day of Judgment, Verses of Surah Al-Saf related to Tafakar, Tadabar (Verse No. 1,14).
Serat of Holy Prophet (S.A.W): Life of Muhammad Bin Abdullah (Before Prophet Hood), life of Holy Prophet (S.A.W) in Makkah, Important lessons derived from the life of Holy Prophet in Makkah. Life of Holy Prophet (S.A.W) in Madina, Important events of life Holy Prophet in Madina, Important lesson derived from the life of Holy Prophet in Madina.
Introduction to Sunnah: Basic concepts of Hadith, history of Hadith, Kinds of Hadith, Uloom-ul-Hadith, Sunnah& Hadith and legal position of Sunnah.
Introduction to Quranic Studies: Basic concepts of Quran, History of Quran, Uloom-ul-Quran.
Islam and Science: Basic concept of Islam & Science, contribution of Muslims in the development of science.
Islamic Economic System: Basic concepts of Islamic Economic System Means of distribution of wealth in Islamic Economics, Islamic concept of Riba, Islamic Ways of Trade & Commerce.

First Year 2nd Semester

Course Title: Introductory Horticulture
Course Code: HORT-302
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Introduction, history, importance and future scope, Definition and divisions of horticulture, Classification of horticultural crops, Plant parts, their modifications and functions, Plant environment; climate (temperature, light, humidity etc) and soil (structure, texture, fertility etc.), Phases of plant growth, Propagation of horticultural plants.

Practical

Visit of nurseries, commercial gardens and public parks. Identification and nomenclature of important fruits, vegetables and ornamental plants; Garden tools and their uses, Media and its preparation. Techniques of propagation.

Recommanded Books

  1. Chadha, K.L. 2006. Handbook of Horticulture (6th Ed.). ICAR, New Delhi, India.
  2. Christopher, E. P. 2012. Introductory Horticulture. Biotech books, new Dehli, India.
  3. Carrol,L., J.R.Shry and H.E. Reily. 2011. Introductory Horticulture (8th Ed.) Delmar-Thomson Learning , Albany, USA
  4. Hartmann, H.T., D.E. Kester, E.T. Davies and R.L. Geneve. 2009. Plant Propagation–Principles and Practices (7th Ed.). Prentice-Hall India Learning Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, India.
  5. Malik, M.N. 1994. Horticulture. National Book Foundations, Islamabad.
  6. Peter, K.V. 2009. Basics of Horticulture. New India publishing Agency, New Dehli, India.
  7. Reiley, H.E., C.L. Shry (Jr). 2004. Introductory Horticulture (6th Ed.). Delmar- Thomson Learning, Albany, USA.
  8. Reddy, R. and Shanker J.P.A. 2008.Horticulture.Commonwealth Publishers.
  9. Sharma, R.R. 2002. Propagation of Horticultural Crops: Principles and Practices. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana, New Delhi, India.

Course Title: Introduction to Plant Pathogens
Course Code: PP-302
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: Biology (Higher Secondary level)

Theory

Introduction and history of plant pathology; basic characteristics of fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes; concept of disease in plants; economic importance of plant diseases; nature and cause of (biotic and abiotic) diseases; components of plant disease development; diagnosis of plant diseases; principles of plant disease management; Introduction to IDM and IPM; symptoms, etiology, mode of infection, disease cycle and management of representative diseases of agricultural and horticultural crops.

Practical

Demonstration of lab equipment’s and reagents; collection, preservation and identification of plant diseases based on symptoms; isolation and inoculation techniques; demonstration of Koch’s postulates.

Recommanded Books

  1. Agrios, G.N. 2005. Plant Pathology, 5th edition, Academic Press, New York, USA.
  2. Ahmad, I. and A.R. Bhutta. 2005. A Text Book of Introductory Plant Pathology. Published by National Book Foundation, Islamabad, Pakistan.
  3. Chaube, H.S. and R. Singh. 2002. Introductory Plant Pathology. International Book Distributing Co.
  4. Hafiz, A. 1986. Plant Diseases. Pakistan Agricultural Research Council, Islamabad, Pakistan.
  5. Mathew, J.D. 2003. Molecular Plant Pathology. Bios Scientific Publishers Ltd. UK.
  6. Mehrotra, R.S. and A. Agarwal. 2003. Plant Pathology, 2nd Edition. TATA McGraw-Hill. Pub. Company Ltd. New Delhi.
  7. Sambamurty, A.V.S.S. 2006. A Text Book of Plant Pathology. I.K. International Pvt. Ltd.
  8. Strange, R.N. 2003. Introduction to Plant Pathology. John Willey & Sons, New York.

Course Title: Introduction to Economics & Agricultural Economics
Course Code: AGEC-302
Course Credit Hours: 3(3+0)
Prerequisites: None

Definitions and overview of economics, Subject Matter and Scope, Theory of consumer behavior, Preferences, Utility and Law of diminishing marginal utility, Indifference Curve Analysis, Demand curve and the law of demand. Supply curve and the law of supply, Elasticity of Demand and Supply, Marketing Equilibrium, Market Structures.

Definition, scope, nature and importance of Agriculture economics, Agriculture as industry, its peculiarities, and its role in national economy, Organization and structure of the agricultural Sector, Factors of production and their rewards, Production possibility frontier, Production function, Laws of return, and its significance in agriculture, Choice and decision making in agricultural production. Land utilization and land use policy, Land tenure systems and land reforms, Important of agriculture sector in Pakistan Economy. Issues of agriculture sector in Pakistan.

Books Recommanded

  1. Mankiw, N. Gregory. 2003. Principles of Economics (Third Edition). South-Western College Publisher.
  2. Hill, Berkeley. 1990. Introduction to Economics for Students of Agriculture. Pergamon Press.
  3. Khuwaja, A. Haleem. 2004. Fundamentals of Economics. Ilmee Kitab Khana, Lahore.
  4. Samuelson, P.A. and Nordhaus, W.D. 2004. Economics (Eighteenth Edition). McGraw Hill, Inc.
  5. Cramer, G. Jensen C.W. and Southgate D.D. 2000. Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness. Eighth Edition. Wiley Publisher.
  6. Penson, J.B. Capp O. and Rossen, C.P. 2001. Introduction to Agricultural Economics. Third Edition, Prentice Hall, New York.
  7. Azhar, B.A. 1996. Pakistan Agricultural Economics. National Book Foundation, Pakistan.
  8. Pakistan, Government of Economic Survey 2003-04. Ministry of Finance, Government of Pakistan.

Course Title: Introductory Rural Sociology
Course Code: RS-302
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Rural Sociology: its origin and scope. Rural-Urban Differences Rural Social Values, and Norms. Social Organization. Culture and Personality. Role and Status. Social Control and Deviation. Social Stratification and Social Mobility. Rural Social Institutions. Cooperation, Conflict and Change. Sociological problems in Development. Village Institutions. Accommodation, Assimilation and Acculturation. Leadership in Rural Society.

Practical

  • Rural village will be visited.
  • Data Collection Tool (structured questionnaire) will be designed.
  • Data will be collected.
  • Data will be fed in statistical computer package.
  • Data will be screened for outliers and missing observations.
  • Analysis of data and interpretation of results.

Recommanded Books

  1. Chitamber, J.B. “Introductory Rural Sociology”, 2003, 2nd Edition, New Age International (P) Limited Publisher, New Delhi.
  2. Dalal, B. 2003. Rural Planning in Developing Countries, New Delhi, Earthscan.
  3. Setty, E. 2002, New Approaches to Rural Development Amal Publications Pvt. Ltd.
  4. Social Policy and Development Centre. 2000. Social Development in Pakistan, New York, Oxford University Press.
  5. Shepherd, Andrew (2000) Sustainable Rural Development, Allama Iqbal Open University, Islamabad.
  6. Khan, Nowshad (2000) Rural Poverty Alleviation, National Book Foundation, Islamabad
  7. Sahibzada, MohibulHaq. 1997. Poverty Alleviation. Institute of Policy Studies. Islamabad.
  8. Chaudhry, Iqbal, 1995. Sociology. Aziz Publication, Lahore.

Course Title: Functional English
Course Code: ENG-302
Course Credit Hours: 2(2+0)
Prerequisites: None

Text Books

Course Title: Pakistan Studies
Course Code: PS-302
Course Credit Hours: 2(2+0)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Ideological rationale with special reference to Sir Syed Ahmed Khan, Allama Muhammad Iqbal and Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah, Factors leading to Muslim separatism, People and Land, Indus Civilization, Muslim advent, Location and geo-physical features.
Government and Politics in Pakistan
Political and constitutional phases:
Contemporary Pakistan
Economic institutions and issues, Society and social structure, Ethnicity, Foreign policy of Pakistan and challenges, Futuristic outlook of Pakistan

Recommanded Books

  1. Burki, Shahid Javed. State & Society in Pakistan, The Macmillan Press Ltd 1980.
  2. Akbar, S. Zaidi. Issue in Pakistan’s Economy. Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2000.

Course Title: Introduction to Computer
Course Code: STAT-302
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Introduction to I.T, Computer, Parts of computer System, CPU, Memory, Memory measurement, Input output devices, Storage, Hardware, Software, Data & Information, Transforming Data into Information, How computers Process Data, Factors affecting Processing Speed, Machinery cycle, Role of Memory, Microsoft Windows, Versions and Editions, Computer locking problem, Regional languages and settings, File system, Files and directories, Files operation, File types, File permission, Computer Networks, Technical Aspect, Server and client, LAN, VAN, VPAN, Transfer speed, Communication, web browser, Mail reader, Voice over IP Programs Search engines, Internet connections, Computer security, Encryption, Digital signature, Keys expiration, Passwords, Alternative password devices, Viruses, Emails, Attachments, Spam, Navigation, Attacks from outside, Firewall, Backup.

Practical

Every student will have to practice on Ms Office 2010 like Exploring Word 2010, Editing and Proofreading Documents, Changing the look of Text, Changing the Look of a Document, Presenting Information in Columns and Tables.

Text Books

  1. Basic computer course book by Dr. Paolo Coletti (Edition 8.0 2105)
  2. Introduction to Computers by Peter Norton’s
  3. Introduction I.T. by Lillian Burke and Barbara Weill. Published by Prentice Hall.

Second Year 1st Semester

Course Title: Principles of Agronomy
Course Code: AGR-401
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Agronomy definition and scope. Principles of Agronomy. Tillage objectives and types. Use of improved seed, seed multiplication and distribution systems. Nutrient management manures and fertilizers, their classification, composition, methods of application. Irrigation management, methods and scheduling. Water use efficiency. Crop protection. Harvesting postharvest management and marketing. Crop rotations and types. Mono vs multiple cropping. Modern concept in agronomy.

Practical

Demonstration and use of tillage implement. Preparatory tillage, seedbed preparation and intercultural operation. Seed purity analysis. Identification of organic and inorganic fertilizers and manures. Calculation of nutrient cum fertilizer unit value. Demonstration and layout of various irrigation methods. Identification of crop pests. Visits to University farms.

Text Books

  1. Abass M.A. 2006. General Agriculture Emporium Urdu Bazar, Lahore.
  2. Balasubramaniyan. 2004. Principles and Practices of Agronomy. Agrobics. Jodhpur India.
  3. Khalil, I.A. and A. Jan, 2002. Cropping Technology. National Book Foundation, Islamabad.
  4. Kirkham, M.B. (Editor) 2004. Water Use in Crop Production. Marosa Publishing House Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, India.
  5. Martin, J.H. R.P Waldren and D.L. Stamp 2006. Principles of Field Crop Production. 4th Ed. The MacMillan Co; New York.
  6. Michael, A.M. 1990. Irrigation Theory and practices 2nd Ed. Vikas Pub. House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
  7. Nazir, M.S. E. Bashir and R. Bantel (Eds.) 1994. Crop Production. Ed. E. Bashir & R. Bantel National Book Foundation, Islamabad.
  8. Reddy, S.R. 2004. Principles of Crop Production. Layani Publishers, New Delhi.
  9. Reddy, T.Y and G.H.S. Reddi. 2004. Principles of Agronomy, Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
  10. Zimdahl, R. 2008. Fundamentals of Weed Science. 3rd Edition, Academic Pres, USA.

Course Title: Introduction to Plant Breeding & Genetics
Course Code: PBG-401
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Introduction to plant breeding and its role in crop improvement. Reproductive systems in major crop plants. Genetic variation and its exploitation, creation of variation through genetic recombination, mutation and heteroploidy. Breeding self-pollinated crops: introduction, mass selection, pure line selection; hybridization, pedigree method, bulk method and backcross techniques. Breeding cross-pollinated crops: introduction, mass selection, recurrent selection, development and evaluation of inbred lines, development of hybrids, synthetic and composite populations. New trends in plant breeding.

Practical

Descriptive study of floral biology, scientific names, chromosome number and ploidy level of important field crops. Selfing and crossing techniques in major crops. List of approved varieties in major field crops.

Text Books

  1. Sleper, D. A. and J.M. Poehlman. 2006. Breeding Field Crops. (5thed.) Iowa State University Press, Ames, USA.
  2. Chahal, G.S. and S.S. Gosal. 2003. Principles and Procedures of Plant Breeding. Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi, India.
  3. Singh, B. D. 2003. Plant Breeding: Principles and Methods. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi, India.
  4. Singh, P. 2003. Essentials of Plant Breeding. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi, India.
  5. Khan, M.A (Editor). 1994. Plant Breeding. National Book Foundation, Islamabad.
  6. Acquaah, G. 2009. Principles of Plant Genetics and Breeding. John Wiley & Sons, UK.

Course Title: Introduction to Pest Management
Course Code: PPT-401
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Agricultural Pests, Categories and causes for outbreak of pest, losses caused by pests. Pest monitoring, Pest surveillance and forecasting, objectives, survey, sampling techniques, and decision making. Economic Threshold level and Economic injury level. Pest management, objectives, requirements for successful pest management program, component of pest management. Pest control methods, Cultural methods, Physical methods, Mechanical methods, Legal methods, Host plant resistance, Biological control, Bio-control Techniques. Chemical control, Classification of pesticides based on mode of entry and chemical nature. Genetic control, Semiochemicals, Allomones, Kairomones, Synomones, Pheromone in integrated pest management IPM, Principles and Strategies

Practical

  • Observations on symptoms and types of damage caused by crop pests.
  • Assessment of pest population and damage in selected crops.
  • Traditional methods of pest control (Cultural, Physical, and Mechanical).
  • Practicing the use of Pheromone, (Light traps and Yellow Sticky traps).
  • Pesticide formulation and label formulations.
  • Pesticide application Technology, Spraying, dusting, Soil application, fumigation.
  • Preparation of spray liquids for field application.
  • Preparation and application of plant products, viruses, bacteria and fungi.
  • Pesticide appliances, types and uses of high volume and low volume sprays and dusters.

Text Books

  1. Dhaliwal, G.S. and E.A. Heinrichs. 1998. Critical issues in pest management, Commonwealth Publishers, New Delhi, 287p.
  2. Dhaliwal, G.S. and Ramesh Arora. 1998. Principles of Insect Pest Management, Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi, 297 p.
  3. Dhaliwal, G.S. and B. Singh. 1998. Pesticides, The ecological impact in developing countries, Commonwealth Publishers, New Delhi.
  4. David, B.V. and M.C. Muralirangan and M.Meera. 1992. Harmful and Beneficial Insect, Popular Book Deport, Madras, 304 p.
  5. David, B.V. and T. Kumaraswami. 1982. Elements of Economic Entomology. Popular Book Deport, Madras, 536 p.

Course Title: Elementary Statistics
Course Code: STAT-401
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Definition, nature and scope of the Statistics. Variables and their types. Data and its sources of collection, Scales of measurement of data, Organization of data. Tabulation and Classification of data (grouped and ungrouped), Frequency distribution. Graphical Representation of data (Graphs and Charts: Stem-and leaf diagrams). Measures of Central Tendency: Mean (arithmetic, geometric and harmonic), Mode, Median & Quantiles, Box and Whisker plots and their interpretation. Relative merits and demerits of various averages. Measures of Dispersion: Range, Mean Deviation, Variance & Standard Deviation. Their properties, usage, limitations and comparison. Trimmed and Winsorized measures. Moments, Measures of Skewness and Kurtosis and describing a shape of distribution of data. Standardized Variables.

Practical

Parts of statistical table, Frequency distribution table, steam and Leaf diagram, Types of Bar Diagram, Pie-chart, Box and Whisker plots, shapes of distributions, calculation of Measures of Central Tendency and dispersion of real data sets.

Text Books

  1. Clark, G. M. and Cooke, D. (2004). “A Basic Course in Statistics.” 5th ed. John Wiley, London.
  2. Chaudhry, S. M. and Kamal, S. (2008). “Introduction to Statistical Theory Part I & II.” 8th ed. Ilmi Kitab Khana Lahore, Pakistan.
  3. Mann, P. S. (2010). “Introductory Statistics.” Wiley.
  4. Mclave, J. T., Benson, P. G. and Snitch, T. (2005). “Statistics for Business & Economics.” 9th ed. Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
  5. Larry, J. S. (2006). “Schaum's Outline of Theory and Problems of Beginning Statistics.” 2nd ed. McGraw Hill New York.
  6. Spiegel, M. R., Schiller, J. L. and Sirinivasan, R. L. (2000). “Probability and Statistics”, 2nd ed. Schaum’s Outlines Series. McGraw Hill. New York.
  7. Sullivan, M. (2011). “Fundamentals of statistics.” 3rd ed. Prentice Hall, Boston.
  8. Walpole, R. E., Myers, R. H and Myers, S. L. (1998). “Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientist.” 6th ed. Prentice Hall, New York.
  9. Weiss, N. A. (1997). “Introductory Statistics.” 4th ed. Addison-Wesley. Company, Inc.

Course Title: Introduction to Agricultural Business Management and WTO
Course Code: AGEC-401
Course Credit Hours: 3(3+0)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Definition, concepts and scope of Agribusiness Management. Important features of Agribusiness. Elements of good management. Functions of management. Forms of business organization. Cooperatives in Agribusiness. Agribusiness financial management. Marketing, Operating and managing human resources in Agribusiness. Input markets in Pakistan. Definition of market and marketing. Role of agri-marketing in economic development. Approaches to understanding agricultural marketing problems. Marketing functions. Marketing institutions. Marketing problems and remedial measures.

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTD). Brief history of General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Formation of the World Trade Organization (WTO); Objectives, basic principles and functions of the WTO. Structure, organization and dispute settlement mechanism of the WTO. Agreements under GATT/WTO. The General mechanism of the WTO. Agreements under GATT/WTO. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)’ Agreement on Agriculture (AoA); and its three pillars; Market Access; Domestic Support; Export competition, Agreement on Trade Related Intellectual. Property Rights (TRIPs). Trade Related Investment Measures (TRIMS).

Text Books

  1. Kohis, R.L. and J.N. Uhi. Marketing of Agricultural Products. Seventh Edition. New York, Max Well. Macmillan. 1990.
  2. Walters, F.E. Marketing of Agricultural Products. Ministry of Food. 1980. Agriculture and Livestock, Govt. of Pakistan and USAID, Islamabad.
  3. Terry, G.R. and Frankin. Principles of Management. The Interstate Printers and Publishes. Illincis. 1982.
  4. World Trade Organization. The legal Texts. The Results of the Uruguay Round of Multilateral Trade Negotiations. Cambridge. 1989.
  5. NUST. WTO and its Impacts on Pakistan’s Agriculture & Trade Institute of Management Sciences, NUSTm Rawalpindi. 2001.
  6. Hoekman, B.A. Mattoo. P English. Development. Trade and the WTO-A Hand Book. The World Bank Washington. D.C. 2002.
  7. Downey, W.D. & S.P. Erickson. Agri. Business Management. McGraw Hill Singapore. 1987.
  8. Web page: www.wto.org.

Course Title: Field Crop Production
Course Code: AGR-402
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Meaning of Development and its Philosophy. Accelerating Agricultural Development. Food Crises: Population Growth and Demand for Food, Economics of Population Growth. Modernization Approach. Social and Cultural Obstacles and Prerequisites to Development. Modes of Production . Sociological Problems of Planned Social Change. Manpower Requirements and Institution Building. Strategy for Research and Extension. Development Economic Framework of Agricultural Modernization. Determinants of Agricultural Development. Review of Rural Development Programs and Policies in Pakistan.

Practical

Rural village will be visited.
Data Collection Tool (structured questionnaire) will be designed.
Data will be collected.
Data will be fed in statistical computer package.
Data will be screened for outliers and missing observations.
Analysis of data and interpretation of results.

Recommanded Books

  1. Adams, W.M. (1990). Green development: Environment and Sustainability in the Third World. London: Routeledge.
  2. Auty, Richard M. (1995). Patterns of Development Resources, Policy and Economic growth. London: Edward Arnold.
  3. Boas, Morten. (2004). Global Institutions and Development: Framing the World? London: Routledge.
  4. Booth, David (1994). Rethinking Social Development. Theory, Research and Practice. England: Longman Scientific and Technical.
  5. Chambers, Robert.( 2005). Ideas for Development. London: Earthscan.
  6. Ettizioni A.E Ettizioni E.O.E Social Change. New York Basic Book Inc, 1964
  7. Lapiere R.T Social Change New York, McGraw Hill Book Company 1965
  8. Moore W.E Social Change. Engle Wood Cliffs, N.J Prantice Hall, Inc, 1974
  9. Swansen, G.E Social Change. Glenview Iii, Forserman And Company, 1971
  10. Smith, A,D The Concept Of Social Change (A Critiqu On Functionalist) Theory Of Social Change). London, Rultedge and Kegan Paul, 1973
  11. Merner, D The Passing Of Traditional Society. New York, The Free Press, 1958.
  12. Berch, Berberogue, Ed. 1992 : Class, State and Development in India 1, 2, 3 and 4 Chapters. Sage, New Delhi
  13. Desai A R 1977 Rural Sociology in India, Popular Prakashan, Bombay.
  14. Mencher J.P., 1983 : Social Anthropology of Peasantry Part III, OUP P.
  15. Radhakrishnan, 1989 : Peasant Struggles : Land reforms and Social Change in Malabar 1836-1982. Sage Publications : New Delhi.

Second Year 2nd Semester

Course Title: Field Crop Production
Course Code: AGR-402
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Objectives

To familiarize the students with production technology of oil seeds, grain legumes, foages and miscellaneous crops.

Theory

Production, technology of oilseed crops (toria, raya, sarsoon, canola, taramira, castor bean, sunflower, safflower, sesame, lined, groundnut, soybean); Grain legumes (chickpea, lentil, mungbean, nashbean; crowpea, pigeon pea). Forage crops (Berseem, shafial, luceme, oats, maize, sorghum, millets, motgrass); Miscellaneous crops (potato, sweet potato, tobacco, tea, medicinal crops); Techniques and practices for enhancing crop productivity.

Practical

Identification and plant characteristic of crops, cultivars and seeds of the crops; Demonstration of improved sowing methods; Inoculation of legume seeds; Intercultural practices; Weed control practices, Demonstration of harvesting and threshing operations; Visits to University/College research areas.

Recommanded Books

  1. Baldev, B.S. Ramamjan and H.K. Jain. 1988. Pulse Crops. Oxford and IBH Pub. Co., New Delhi.
  2. Martin, J.H., R.P. Waldren and D.L. Stamp. 2006. Principles of Field Crop Production. 4th edition. The McMillan Co; New York.
  3. Nazir, M.S., E. Bashir and R. Bantel (Eds.) 1994. Crop Production. National Book Foundation, Islamabad.
  4. Rahman, A. and M. Munir. 1984. Rapeseed, Mustard Production in Pakistan, PARC, Islamabad.
  5. Reddy, S.R. 2004. Principles of Crop Production. 2nd Ed. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
  6. Wolfe, T.K. and M.S. Kipps. 2004. Production of Field Crop: A Text Book of Agronomy, McGraw Hill Book Co; New York.

Course Title: Applied Entomology
Course Code: ENT-402
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

  1. Acquire knowledge of insect pests of crops, vegetables, fruits, stored grains and household pests.
  2. Identification of insect pests, their control methods and pesticide application equipments.
  3. Introduction with entomological cottage industries.
  4. Enhance the productivity of agricultural crops through insect pest management.

Theory

Introduction; causes of success and economic importance of insects; principles and methods of insect control i.e. cultural, biological, physical, mechanical, reproductive, legislative, chemical and bio-technological control; introduction to IPM; insecticides, their classification, formulations and application equipments; dentification,lifehistories,modeofdamageandcontrolofimportantinsect pests of various crops, fruits, vegetables, stored grains, household, termites and locust; introduction to entomological industries: apiculture, sericulture and lac-culture.

Practical

Collection, identification and mode of damage of insect pests of various crops, fruits, vegetables, stored grains and household; insecticide formulations, their dilutions and safe handling; use of application equipment, instructions for apiculture, sericulture and lac-culture.

Recommanded Books

  1. Atwal, A.S. 2005. Agricultural Pests of Southeast Asia and their Management. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana.
  2. Awastheir, V.B. 2009. Introduction to General and Applied Entomology. Scientific Publisher, Jodhpur, India.
  3. Duncton, P.A. 2007. The Insect: Beneficial and Harmful Aspects. Kalyani Publishers Ludhiana.
  4. Gullan, P. J. and Cranstan, P. S. 2010. The Insects: An Outline of Entomology. 4th edition. Wiley-Blackwell. A John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Publication, UK.
  5. Lohar, M. K. 2001. Applied Entomology, 2nd Ed. Department of Entomology, Sindh Agriculture University Tandojam Sindh, Pakistan.
  6. Mathews, G.A. 2004. Pesticide Application Methods, 3rd. Ed. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. N.Y.
  7. Pedigo, L.P. and Marlin, E. R. 2009. Entomology and Pest Management, 6th Edition, Person Education Inc., Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458, U.S.A.
  8. Pfadt, E.R. 1985. FundamentalsofApplied Entomology, 4thEd. The McMillan Co., N. Y.
  9. Robinson, D.H. 2006. Entomology Principles and Practices. Agro-bios.
  10. Shah, H.A. and Saleem,M.A. 2002, Applied Entomology, 3rdEd. Izhar Sons Printers, Lahore.

Course Title: Farm Mechanization
Course Code: FPM-402
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

  • Farm Mechanization Definition, objects and scope of Farm Mechanization in Pakistan, Feasibility and approach of Mechanization in various ecological zones of Pakistan.
  • Farm Power, source of Farm Power, Types of Tractors, Fuel and Lubricants, working safety precautions and driving principles, Basic and operating costs of tractors, trouble shooting.
  • Farm Machinery: Materials used in Farm Machinery, Ferrous and non-ferrous metals, machine elements and transmission of power classification, constructions and used of pre-sowing, post sowing, harvesting and transport machines, hitching principles calibration of drills, sprayers and harvesting/threshers of farm Machinery selection and management, requirement of farm machines for different soils, land holdings and crops, field efficiency and cost analysis of using farm machines, post-harvest handling and average of farm products.

Practical

Use of tool kit, study of various tractor systems, tractor maintenance and repairs demonstration of farm machinery, calibration of drills, sprayers and thresher/harvesters, assessment of cost of using machines giving on comparative cost benefits analysis in practical farming.

Recommanded Books

  1. Frod R.J. Farm Gas Engines and Tractors, McGraw Hill Book Co.
  2. Bainer and Kepner, Principles of Farm Machinery, Jhon Willey and Sons.
  3. Barger Etal. Tractors and Their power Units, Jhon Willey and Sons.
  4. Bresess and Forst. Farm Power, Jhon Willey and Sons.
  5. Promers B and Bishp. Modern Farm Power, Principles Hall Inc. N.J. US.A.
  6. Ricery. Agricultural Hand Book. McGraw Hill Books. Co.
  7. Stone A. A. Machines for Power Farming, Book Co. New York.
  8. Stone and Gulvin, Farm Machinery.
  9. Smith, Farm Machinery and Equipment. McGraw Hill Book Co.

Course Title: Calculus
Course Code: MATH-402
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: Mathematics (Algebra)

Specific Objectives of the Course

To prepare the students, not majoring in mathematics with the essential tools of calculus to apply the concepts and the techniques in their respective disciplines.

Course Outline

Preliminaries: Real-number line, functions and their graphs solution of equations involving absolute values, inequalities.
Limits and Continuity: Limit of a function, left-hand and right-hand limits, continuity, continuous functions.
Derivatives and their Applications: Differentiable functions differentiation of polynomial, rational and transcendental functions, derivates.
Integration and Definite Integrals: Techniques of evaluating indefinite integrals, integration by substitution, integration by parts change of variables in indefinite integrals.

Recommanded Books

  1. Anton, H. Bevens I. Davis S. Calculus: A New Horizon (8th edition), 2005. John Wiley, New York.
  2. Stewart J, Calculus (3rd edition), 1995, Brooks/Cole (Suggested text).
  3. Swokiowski, E.E. Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 1983. PWS-Kent Company, Boston.
  4. Thomas GB, Finney AR, Calculus (11th edition), 2005. Addison-Wesley, Reading, Ma, USA.

Course Title: Introduction to Probability & Random Variables
Course Code: STAT-402
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Probability Concepts: Addition and Multiplication rules, Laws of probability, joint and marginal probabilities, Conditional probability and independence, Bayes’ theorem. Discrete Random Variables, Probability Distribution function of discrete random variables, Mean and Variance of a discrete random variable, Continuous random variables and their probability density function. Joint distributions and bi-variate distribution functions of random variables, Mathematical expectation of a random variable.

Practical

Laws of probability, conditional probability, discrete and continuous random variables, mathematical expectation, marginal and joint probabilities.

Recommanded Books

  1. Cacoullos, T. (2009). “Exercises in Probability.” Springer- Verlag, New York.
  2. Chaudhry, S. M. and Kamal, S. (2008). “Introduction to Statistical Theory Part I & II.” 8th ed. Ilmi Kitab Khana Lahore, Pakistan.
  3. Mann, P. S. (2010) Introductory Statistics. Wiley.
  4. Clark, G.M. and Cooke, D. (1998), “A Basic Course in Statistics” 4th ed, Arnold, London.
  5. Mclave, J. T., Benson, P. G. and Snitch, T. (2005). “Statistics for Business & Economics.” 9th ed. Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
  6. Santos, D. (2011). “Probability: An Introduction.” Jones and Bartlett Publishers, New York.
  7. Spiegel, M. R., Schiller, J. L. and Sirinivasan, R. L. (2000). “Probability and Statistics”, 2nd ed. Schaums Outlines Series. McGraw Hill, New York.
  8. Walpole, R. E., Myers, R. H. and Myers, S. L. (2007). “Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientist.” 7th ed. Prentice Hall, NY.
  9. Weiss, N.A. (1997), “Introductory Statistics” 4th ed. Addison-Wesley Company, Inc.

Course Title: Introduction to Extension Teaching Methods
Course Code: AEE-402
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

Extension as an educational process: types of education; Extension teaching methods; Individual, Group, Mass teaching methods; Demonstration: Role and types of demonstration; Adoption and diffusion process: Adoption, Diffusion, Adopter Categories; types of innovation decision innovation development and diffusion process; Communication: Meaning, definition, purposes, process, principles, forms and SMCR model; Audio-Aids: Introduction, importance, classification and uses. Electronic and print media.

Practical

Preparation of Teaching Material for farmers group on various topics such as charts, graphs, posters, flannel graphs, leaflets, posters, slides, transparencies etc; Presentation of the AV materials; field trips to various organization involved in dissemination of technology.

Recommanded Books

  1. E. Bashir (Ed.) Extension Methods: National Book Foundation, Islamabad.
  2. FAO Manual, Improving Agricultural Extension in Developing Countries, FAO, Rome.

Course Title: Writing Skills
Course Code: ENG-402
Course Credit Hours: 2(2+0)
Prerequisites: None

Theory

  1. Technical writing
  2. Rules of Paragraph and Essay
  3. V. Writing
  4. Application Writing
  5. Formal and Informal Letter Writing
  6. Phonetics; Use of Phonemes and Sounds of Words
  7. Idioms and Pro-verbs
  8. Dictionary Skills
  9. Précis Writing

Recommanded Books

  1. The lighthouse by Muttahir Ahmed Khan
  2. Exploring the World of English by Sadad Ali Shah
  3. Technical Writing Made Easier by Bernard Spuida
  4. Oxford Practice Grammar by John East Wood
  5. English for Undergraduate by D. H. Lowe

Third Year 1st Semester

Course Title: COMMUNITY DEVEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL MOBILIZATION
Course Code: RS-501
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

The course aims at acquainting the students with the basic concepts of community development, approaches, strategies and theories. The emphasis will be placed on community mobilization and organization. The course will also focus on participatory models of community development as well.

Course Contents:

Introduction

  • Meaning and definition of community.
  • Meaning and definition of community development.
  • Objectives of community development.
  • Basic principles of community development.
  • Functions of community development worker.
Philosophy of Community Development
  • Elements of Community Development.
  • Philosophy of Community Development.
  • Limitation in Community Development
Early Community Development Programmes of Pakistan
  • The V-AID programme.
  • The Basic Democracy (B.D’s) System.
  • The Integrated Rural Development Programme (IRDP).
  • The People’s Works Programme (PWP).
  • Rural Works Programme (RWP)
Community Organization
  • Community Organization, Meaning and Definitions
  • Difference Between Community Development and Community Organization.
  • Aims and Objectives of Community Organization.
  • Philosophy of Community Organization.
  • Assumptions Pertaining Community Life.
  • Role of Community Organizer.
Community Participation
  • Community Participation, Meaning and Definitions.
  • Types of Community Participations.
  • Causes of lack of Community Participation.
Techniques of Community Development
  • Meaning and definitions
  • Social mobilization
  • Barriers in Social Mobilization
  • Social Organization
  • Resource Mobilization
Planning and Social Planning
  • Meaning and Definition.
  • Kinds of Planning
  • Principles of Planning
  • Importance of Planning
  • Basic steps in Planning
  • Social Planning
  • Various steps for Social Planning
  • Importance of Social Planning
Development Through NGOs
  • Meaning of NGO/CSO’s
  • Features of NGO/CSO’s
  • Growth of NGO’S in Pakistan
  • Role of NGOs in Community Development

Practical

The students will be required to visit rural communities directly or through NGOs and study major community development programs. They will also try to motivate villagers/rural peoples to launch small projects on “Self-Help” basis, and finally students will be asked to submit the report to the concerned teacher in the shape of assignment.

Recommanded Books

  1. Alam A. (2004). Community Development. Peshawar, Saif Printing Press,
  2. Grosser, Chales, F. (1973). New Direction in Community Organization. London, Pareger Publisher.
  3. Khalid, SM (2001). Social Work Theory and Practice. Karachi, Millat Publication.
  4. Leapiere, R.A.B. (2001). Community Work, National Council of Social Services, 26 Bedford Square. King, Co
  5. Mozirow, Jack, (2001). Dynamics of Community Development New York The Fleare Crow Press
  6. Pearlman, R. et al (1996). Community Organization and Social Planning. New York, Horcout, Brueo And Company
  7. Peter, H (2001). Community Organization. London, Roultedge and Kagan Paul.
  8. Rafique. Z.R. (1985). Techniques and Methods In Community Development. Department of Social Work, University of Peshawar.
  9. Ross, Murry, G. (2002). Case Histories in Community Organization. New York, Harper Brother

Course Title: SOCIOLOGY OF AGRICULTURE
Course Code: RS-503
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

This course will prepare the students to understand the theoretical, historical and empirical issues of Agriculture in Pakistan with additional discussion of the global dimension of many agri. food networks.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • Field of Agricultural Sociology.
    • Agricultural Sociology as a Science.
  2. A Brief History of Thinking about Rural Urban Life
  3. Approaches to the study of Rural Society and Social System
    • Approach, Elements and Processes
    • Institutional Approach
  4. An understanding of the Rural Social System
    • Rural Social structure.
    • Caste and "baradari" structure.
    • Dispute and "We-groups".
  5. Pattern of Rural Settlement
    • Rural Resources.
    • Land Tenure System.
    • Size of landholdings.
  6. Provision of services in rural area
    • Health
    • Education and sanitation etc.
  7. Problems of small and fragmented holding
    • Landless tenants and agricultural labor.
  8. Social Change
    • Introduction.
    • Factors in Acceptance and Resistance to Change.
    • Role of Extension Worker as Change Agent.
  9. Small scale farming.
  10. Feudalism.
  11. Capitalism.
  12. Family farming.
  13. Agrarian politics and village development.
  14. Relationship between technological and socio economic aspect of rural society.

Practical

The students will be required to visit villages to study agricultural societies to understand the culture of rural life. In addition, students will be asked to submit a report on village life with their major problems needs to be addressed at provincial and national level.

Recommanded Books

  1. Chitambar, J. B. 2001. Introductory Rural Sociology. New Age International (P) limited Publisher, New Delhi.
  2. Heslin, J. M. 1991. Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings. 6th edition. The Free Press, New York.
  3. Michael, M. C. 1991. Putting People First-Sociological Variable in Development, 2nd edition. Oxford University Press.
  4. Richard, T. R. 1995. Sociology. (5th Edition). McGraw Hill Publishing Co..

Course Title: DISASTER RISK MANAGEMENT
Course Code: RS-505
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

This provides basic knowledge of hazards, disasters, risks, vulnerability and capacity including natural, climatic and human induced factors and associated impacts. To know the different phases of disaster management cycle. To know the multidisciplinary and multispectral approach in DM.

Course Contents:

Definitions of Natural Hazards and Disasters

  • Classification of Disasters, Disaster risks, Vulnerabilities, and Capacities.
  • Hydro, Meteorological Hazards, Geo Hazards, Complex and Biological Hazards.
  • Introduction to Disaster Planning and Management
  • Significance of Disaster Planning and Management
  • Disaster Management Cycle
    • Prevention
    • Mitigation
    • Preparedness
    • Impact
    • Response
    • Recovery
    • Development
  • Hazards and Resources.
  • Man and Environment Relationship.
  • Risk as the product of hazard and vulnerability.
    • Types of Vulnerability
    • Triggers for Capacity Development
    • Capacity Dimension
  • Capacity
    • Types and level of Capacity
    • Causes of increasing Vulnerability
    • Capacity Dimension
  • Elements at Risk.
  • Planning Process.
  • Participatory disaster risk management planning.
  • Introduction to CBDRM.
  • National Disaster Management Policy and Legislation.

Practical

The students will be required to visit NGOs/CBOs those are/were working on disaster management; however some affected communities will also be visited to know about risk level and their coping strategies. Finally students will be asked to submit the report to the concerned teacher.

Recommanded Books

  1. BIRKMANN, J. (2006) Measuring Vulnerability to Natural Hazards: Towards Disaster Resilient Societies. Tokyo, United Nations University Press.
  2. BURTON, I.; Kates, R.W. and White, G.F. (1993) The Environment as Hazard, The Guildford Press, London, UK.
  3. COLLINS, A.E. (2009) Disaster and Development, Routledge, London, UK.
  4. CROUHY, Michel; Galai, Dan and Mark, Robert (2005) The Essentials of Risk Management. The McGraw Hill Co., New York, US. 17.
  5. DAMON, P. C. (2006) International Disaster Management. Butterworth-Heinemann.
  6. DAMON, P. C. (2006) Introduction to International Disaster Management. Butterworth-Heinemann, UK.
  7. DILLEY, Max (2005) Natural Disaster Hotspots: A Global Risk Analysis. World Bank and University of Columbia, US.
  8. ELLIOT, J.E. (2006) An Introduction to Sustainable Development. Third Edition. Routledge, London UK.

Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO POPULATION STUDIES
Course Code: RS-507
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

Relevant concepts of population dynamics shall be explored. The theories in relation to population growth will be shared. The concept of culture and social values regarding population growth will be emphasized. The variables including fertility, mortality, and migration shall be studied with reference to change in population in a given area. Population policies about growth and control will be learnt.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • The significance of population study .
    • Scope of Population studies.
    • Sources of population data.
  2. Theories of Population
    • Ibn-e-Khaldun theory.
    • Malthusian population trap and its criticism.
    • Theory of demographic transition.
  3. Population growth in Pakistan
    • Historical trends
    • Present population situation
    • Future prospects
  4. Demographic processes
    • Nuptiality
    • Fertility: socio-economic variables affecting fertility
    • Migration
    • Social Mobility
    • Mortality: Socio-economic variables affecting mortality
  5. The structure of Pakistan's population
    • Geographic distribution
    • Age and Sex structure
    • Education, Dependency burdens. Birth rates: their relationships to GNP growth rates and income distribution
  6. Family Planning
    • Social Acceptance
    • Status of Family Planning in Rural and Urban Areas
    • Strategies by Government and NGOs to create awareness
  7. Population related problems of Pakistan
    • Economic factors behind high fertility rate
    • Social, cultural and, ethnic factors behind high fertility rates
    • Mortality especially maternal and Infant mortality
  8. The population debates
    • Some conflicting opinions
    • The micro-economic theory of fertility
    • The demand for children in developing countries

    Practical

    Students have to submit a comprehensive research report, demonstrating various dimensions of Pakistan population based on data collected from different relevant government and non-government organization.

    Recommanded Books

    1. Paul Demeny (2003) Geoffrey Mcnicoll Encyclopedia of Population Macmillan Reference U.S.A (Thomson/Gale)
    2. Todero, M.P., 2000, Economics Development in the Third World. Longman, London.
    3. United Nations (2004). Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Retrieved in 2004.
    4. Weeks John R (1992), Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues. Belmart California, Wadsworth Publishing Company.Richard, T. R. 1995. Sociology. (5th Edition). McGraw Hill Publishing Co..

Course Title: ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
Course Code: RS-509
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

The course aims to learn about environmental sociology and explore the relationship between human societies and the larger natural environment of which they are a part. It also reviews the history of resource use, wilderness preservation, pollution, various environmental movements, and other developments with significant ecological implications.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • Definition and Concepts of Environmental Sociology
    • Scope and Importance of Environmental Sociology
  2. Industrialization or Capitalism
    • Ecological Conditions before the Industrial Revolution
    • ii. The Environment at the Time of the Industrial Revolution
  3. The Modern Economy and its Ecological Implications
    • Expansion and Conservation
    • Imperialism and Ecology
  4. Consumer Society
    • Consumption and Materialism
    • The Fetishism of the Commodity and its Secret
    • The State of Consumption Today
    • Modern Environmentalism
  5. The Origins of Modern Environmentalism
    • The Ideology of Scientific Conservationism
    • The Growth of the Wilderness Idea
  6. A New Paradigm Emerges
    • The Ecology of Affluence
    • Sixties Seedtime
  7. Environmental Movements
    • Environmental Movements in Taiwan
    • Environmental Movements in Thailand
    • Environmental Movements in the Philippines
    • Culture and Asian Styles of Environmental Movements
  8. Exploring Environmental Problems/Issues
    • Gender, Justice, and Environmental Issues
    • ii. Race, Justice, and Environmental Issue
    • iii. Social Class, Justice, and Environmental Issues
  9. Social Justice and environmental issues
    • Air Pollution
    • Water Pollution
    • Noise Pollution
    • Depletion of Ozone layer
  10. Causes of Environmental Disruption
    • The state and policy: Imperialism
    • Exclusion and ecological violence as state policy
    • The science of nature and the nature of science

Practical

The students in groups will be required to accomplish a project related to environmental sociology and display at faculty level, or make survey to local rural areas to identify the related current problems in black and white.

Recommanded Books

  1. Bell, Michael Mayerfeld (2004). An Invitation to Environmental Sociology. Thousand
  2. Bell, Michael Mayerfeld. 2004. An Invitation to Environmental Sociology. Thousand Oaks, California: Pine Forge Press.
  3. Brown, Janet W., Pamela S. Chasek, and Gareth Porter. 2000. Global Environmental Politics. Boulder,
  4. Brown, Lester R. 2001. "Eradicating Hunger." Pp. 43-62 in State of the World 2001, edited by Lester R.
  5. Drew. 1996. "Ecology and the Common Good: Catholic Social Teaching and Environmental Colorado: Westview Press.
  6. Environment, Development and Social Movements. London and New York: Routledge.
  7. Eric Darier (ed.) (1999). Discourses of the Environment. Malden, Penn:
  8. Frey, R. Scott , R. Scott (ed.) (2001). The Environment and Society Reader. Boston,
  9. Frey, R. Scott. 2001. "Environmental Problems from the Local to the Global." Pp. 4-25 in The Environment
  10. Gardner, Gary, Erik Assadourian, and Radhika Sarin. 2004. "The State of Consumption Today." Pp. 3-21 in State of the World 2004, edited by Linda Starke. Washington: World Watch Institute.
  11. Gardner, Gary. 2003. "Engaging Religion in the Quest for a Sustainable World." Pp. 152-176 in State of the World 2003, edited by Linda Starke. Washington: World watch Institute.
  12. Gunter, Valerie and S. K. Smith (2007). Volatile Places: A Sociology of communities and Haven: Yale University Press.
  13. Humphrey, C. R., T. L. Lewis, and F. H. Buttel (2003). Environment, Energy, and Joseph Murphy and Maurie J. Cohen. New York: Pergamon.
  14. Ken Conca, GeofFrey, R. Scott D. Dabelko (eds.) (2004). Green planet blues :London, Toronto: Allyn and Bacon.
  15. Murphy, Joseph, and Maurie J. Cohen. 2001. "Consumption, Environment, and Public Policy." Pp. 3-17 in Exploring Sustainable Consumption: Environmental Policy and the Social Sciences.
  16. Murphy, Raymond. 1994. Rationality and Nature: A Sociological Inquiry into a hanging Relationship.
  17. Narayanan, Vasudha. 2001. "Water, Wood, and Wisdom: Ecological Perspectives from the Hindu Oaks: Pine Forge.
  18. Paehlke, Robert C. (1989). Environmentalism and the future progressive politics. New Press.
  19. Richard Peet, and Michael Watts (eds.) (2004). Liberation Ecologies, Second Edition: Society: Exemplary Works. Thomson.
  20. Sale, Kirkpatrick. 1993. The Green Revolution: The American Environmental
  21. Movement 1962-1992. New York: Hill & Wang.

Course Title: RURAL SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS
Course Code: RS-511
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Learning Objectives

  • This course will give detailed introduction about social institutions serving rural people in Pakistan.
  • Enable the students about the role of social institutions in delivering services to rural development and change.

Course Contents:

  1. Social Institutions
    • Characteristics of Rural Social Institutions
    • Types of Rural Social Institutions
    • Elements of Social Institutions in Rural Development
  2. Social Environment and Rural Institutions
  3. Institutions and Instruments of Social Control
  4. Role of the Rural Family
    • Its Structure, Functions and Types
  5. Rural Education institution
    • Structure
    • Functions and Issues and role of education institution in rural development
  6. Rural Economic Institutions
    • Structure
    • Functions and Issues
  7. Rural Political Institutions
    • Structure and Functions
  8. Distribution of Power
    • Types of Authority
    • Functions of State
  9. Rural Recreational Institutions
    • Structure and Functions
  10. Rural Religious and Social Welfare Institutions

Practical

Students have to submit a comprehensive research report, demonstrating various rural social institutions and elaborate their functions.

Suggested Readings

  1. Chitambar, J. B. 1997. “Introductory Rural sociology” latest edition. New Age International (P) Limited Publisher, New Delhi
  2. Kendall, L and Murray. 2007. Sociology in our Times, 4th Canadian Edition. Wadsworth
  3. Khan, N. (2000) Rural Poverty Alleviation, National Book Foundation, Islamabad.
  4. Shepherd, A. 2000 Sustainable Rural Development, Allama Iqbal Open University, Islamabad.
  5. Singh K. 2000. Rural Development; Principles, Policies and Management, New Delhi, Sage Publications.

Third Year 2nd Semester

Course Title: MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY
Course Code: RS-502
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

The course focuses at providing basic concepts and models of health sciences. The psycho-socio and cultural assessment of health seeking behavioral patterns and the role of therapeutic management group will be examined. The indigenous healing system and contemporary medical system will be studied.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • Health and the field of the Sociology
    • Contribution of sociology to medicine.
  2. Health and disease
    • Social definition of illness.
    • Health and disease as deviant behavior.
    • Social cultural causes of disease.
  3. Sociological perspectives on health and Illness
    • Functionalist Approach
    • Conflict Approach
    • Interactionist Approach
    • Labeling Approach
  4. Illness Behaviour and Perceptions of Illness
    • Illness Behavior
    • Cultural Influences on Illness Behavior
    • Sociological and Demographic Influences
    • Lay Beliefs About Health and Illness
    • Self-medication
    • Sick Role
  5. Social Determinants of Health
    • The Social Gradient
    • Stress
    • Early Life
    • Life Expectancy
    • Education and literacy
    • Employment/Working conditions
    • Social environments
    • Addiction
    • Food
    • Transport
  6. Patient and Doctor
    • Doctors view of disease and the patient
    • Patient’s perspective of illness
    • Patient doctor relationship
    • Patient-nurses relation
  7. Sociology of medical care
    • Hospitals
    • Origin and development
  8. Hospitals as social organization: problems of Quackery
  9. Interpersonal relationship in medical settings
  10. Mental illness in sociological perspective
  11. Complementary and alternative Medicine (CAM)

Practical

Students will be required to conduct a survey to understand the public health issues in rural areas. Submit a brief report on the issue and suggest few policy implications. However, department will also arrange few visits to hospitals to identify the strengths and weaknesses of health care system in sociological perspective.

Recommanded Books

  1. A.P Dixit (2005) Global Hiv/Aids Trends, Vista International Publications house New Delhi;
  2. Bauggartner, Teda (1994), Conducting and reading research in health and human performance. England, Brow and Benchmarn Publishers.
  3. David Tucket (Ed), An Introduction to Medical Sociology, London, Taritocl Publication, 1976.
  4. David Tucket. 1982. An Introduction to Medical Sociology. Tavistock Publication, London.
  5. David, Mechanic, Medical Sociology, New York. The Free Press, 1960.
  6. David, Mechanic. 1990. Medical Sociology. The Free Press. New York
  7. Diarmuid O Donovan (2008) The State of Health Atlas University of California Press;
  8. G. C Satpathy (2003) Prevention of HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse Isha Books;
  9. G.C. Satpalhy (2003) Prevention of Hiv/Aids and Drug abuse, isha Books, New Delhi.
  10. Global Health Challenges for Human Security (ed.) Lincoln Chen et el. Global Equity. UK 2003.
  11. Jai P Narain (2004) Aids in Asia the challenge a head , Sage Publications New Delhi;
  12. Julia A Ericksen (2008) Taking charge of Breast Cancer University of California Press;
  13. Meena Sharma (2006) Aids, Awareness Through Community Participation Kalpaz Publications Delhi;
  14. Moon, Graham (1995) Society and Health. An Introduction to Social Science for Health Professional. London. Routledge.
  15. Moward E. Treaman at. Al. Handbook of Medical Sociology, Englewood Cliffs, NJ Prentice Hall, Inc. 1963.
  16. P Dixit (2005) Global HIV/AIDS Trends, Vista International Publishing House Delhi 110053;
  17. Rose Weitz (2004) The Sociology of health, Illness and health care a critical approach Thomson wads worth.
  18. Rubina Sehgal(2004)The Trouble Times; Sustainable Development in the age of extreme. Islamabad.
  19. Schilla Mclean and G. Mahar. 1983. Medicine, Morals and Law, Gower Publishing Co. Ltd. UK.
  20. Shah, Ilyas (1998) Community Medicine . Karachi.
  21. The Body, Culture and Society: An Introduction by Philip, Hancock et. el. Open University Press. Buckingham.
  22. The Sociology of Health and Medicine: A Critical Introduction by Ellen Annandale. Polity Press 1998.

Course Title: SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Course Code: RS-504
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

Market has emerged as a dominant institution in modern society and is the focus of academia and every graduate are supposed to create a space in the market for their own survival. With the ascendancy of globalization and the rise of multinationals market it has further increase competitions across the borders and the ratio of un-employment has gained a pace and has become a monster. In view of these trends, the importance of the course on Social entrepreneurship has been introduced to equip the students and to inculcate the practical value of knowledge for the advancement of society in term of employment which is one of the themes of applied sociology.

The course is designed to achieve multidisciplinary knowledge of marketing, small scale business to the students and to equip them with skills of social marketing to sensitize them to the ethical issues in marketing to prepare them for professional careers in industry and business management as well as governmental and non-governmental organization.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • Definition, and explanation as an evolving concept
    • Social entrepreneurship – a perspective
    • Emerging trends: the internet and e-commerce
    • Social entrepreneurial opportunities
    • The evolution of social entrepreneurship
    • The myths & approaches to social entrepreneurship
  2. Understanding Strategic Issues in Business Plan Development
    • Comparative analysis of social entrepreneurship in other countries
    • Strategic Objectives
    • Competitor Analysis
    • STP Strategies
    • Marketing Mix Strategies
  3. Understanding the Social Entrepreneurial Perspective in Individuals
    • The social Entrepreneurial Perspective
    • The Dark side of Social Entrepreneurship
    • Social Entrepreneurial Motivation
  4. Innovation: The Creative Pursuit of Ideas
    • Opportunity Identification: The search for New Ideas
    • Social Entrepreneurial Imagination and Creativity
    • The role of Creative Thinking
    • Arenas in Which People Are Creative
    • Innovation and the Entrepreneur
    • The Innovation Process
  5. Pathways to Entrepreneurial Ventures
    • The Pathways to New Ventures for Entrepreneurs
    • Creating New Ventures
  6. Legal and Social Challenges for Entrepreneurial Ventures
    • Legal Challenges for the Entrepreneurial Venture
    • Intellectual Property Protection: Patents, Copyrights, and Trademarks
    • Identifying Legal Structures for Entrepreneurial Ventures
    • Sole Proprietorships
    • Partnerships
    • Corporations
    • Specific Forms of Partnerships and Corporations
    • Understanding Bankruptcy

Practical

The students will be required to visit villages to study the mainly agricultural related opportunities of livelihood on self-help basis that also must have social impact to the societies and submit a report on it.

Recommanded Books

  1. Abu-Saifan, S. 2012. Social Entrepreneurship: Definition and Boundaries. Technology Innovation Management Review. February 2012: 22-27.
  2. David Bornstein, How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas, Oxford University Press (and others) ISBN 0-19-513805-8
  3. Charles Leadbeater, (1996). The Rise of the Social Entrepreneur, Demos, 1996
  4. Joanna Mair, Jeffrey Robinson, and Kai Hockerts, (2006).Social Entrepreneurship, Palgrave, ISBN 1-4039-9664-4
  5. Peredo, A. M., & McLean, M. 2006. Social Entrepreneurship: A Critical Review of the Concept. Journal of World Business, 41(1)..
  6. John Elkington and Pamela Hartigan, (2008). The Power of Unreasonable People: How Entrepreneurs Creates Markets to Change the World, Harvard Business Press.
  7. Robert Gunn and Christopher Durkin, (2010). Social Entrepreneurship: A Skills Approach, Policy Press.
  8. Thompson, J.L. (2002) The World of the Social Entrepreneur, The International Journal of Public Sector Management, 15(4/5).
  9. Munoz, J.M.(2010).International Social Entrepreneurship : Pathways to Personal and Corporate Impact. New York: Business Expert Press. .
  10. Demos (1996). 'The Rise of the Social Entrepreneur, London.
  11. Shane, Scott (2003). A General Theory of Entrepreneurship: the Individual-Opportunity Nexus., Edward Elgar. ISBN 1-84376-996-4
  12. Reynolds, Paul D. (2007). Entrepreneurship in the United States. Springer, ISBN 978-0-387-45667-6
  13. Howkins, John (2001)..The Creative Economy: How People Make Money From Ideas. Penguin,
  14. Ebbena, Jay; Johnson, Alec (2006). "Bootstrapping in small firms: An empirical analysis of change over time", Journal of Business Venturing, Volume 21, Issue 6, November 2006, Pages 851-865
  15. Bailetti T. (2012).Technology Entrepreneurship: Overview, Definition, and Distinctive Aspects. Technology Innovation Management Review. (February 2012: Technology Entrepreneurship.
  16. Duening, Thomas N., Hisrich, Robert D., Lechter, Michael A. (2009). Technology Entrepreneurship, Academic Press, 2009. ISBN 978-0-12-374502-6
  17. Livingston, Jessica, (2007). Founders at work: stories of startups' early days, Berkeley, CA : Apress ; New York : Distributed to the book trade worldwide by Springer-Verlag New York,. ISBN 978-1-59059-714-9
  18. Lundström, Anders und Stevenson, Lois (2005), Entrepreneurship Policy: Theory and Practice, Springer. ISBN-10: 1441936939
  19. Richard Swedberg, Entrepreneurship: The Social Science View, Oxford Univ Press, ISBN-13: 978-0198294610

Course Title: SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Course Code: RS-506
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

The course aims to introduce the pertinent concepts and theories about evolution of humans and culture. The course will dilate branches of anthropology including physical anthropology, archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, and linguistic anthropology.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction, Meaning and Definition of Social Anthropology
    • Nature of Social Anthropology
    • Sub-Fields in Social Anthropology
    • Scope of Social Anthropology.
  2. Social Stratification in Simple Societies
    • Egalitarian Societies.
    • Ranked Societies.
    • Class and Caste ridden Societies.
  3. Marriage and Family Institution
    • Introduction to family and Marriage system
    • Functions of family in rural areas
    • Universality of Marriage
    • Ways of Marriage
    • Theories on INCEST TABOO
    • Forms of Marriage
  4. Kinship Structure
    • Variation in Marital Residence
    • Major Systems in Kinship Terminology
    • Omaha System
    • Crow System
    • Iroquois System
    • Eskimo System
  5. Political Institution/Organization
    • Types of Political Organizations
    • Resolution of Conflicts
  6. Religion Institution
    • Universality of Religion
    • Variation in Beliefs Religious
    • Variation in Practice Religious
    • Religion and Magic
  7. Economic Institution
    • Division of Labour
    • Reciprocity System
    • System of Redistribution

Practical

The students will be required to visit villages, museum and archeological sites to understand anthropological matters. In addition, students will be asked to submit a report on various anthropological aspects of village life.

Recommanded Books

  1. M. Darshan S. (2000). Encyclopedia of Anthropology (Vol.7). Social Anthropology. Mittal Publication New-Delhi
  2. Wilcox. C. (2008) Social Anthropology (Edited). Transition Publishers. New Jersey. USA.
  3. Pritchard Evans (2004). Social Anthropology. Taylor and Francis Group.
  4. Peoples. J & Bailey. G (2008) Humanity: An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (8th ed). Wadsworth Cengage Learning. Belmont, CA, USA.
  5. Francis D Pocock (1998). Understanding Social Anthropology. New Jersey USA. ISBN 0485121409.
  6. Epstien A.L. (2012 Edited). The Craft of Social Anthropology. New Jersey. USA.
  7. Adamson’s, Hobbled Everett (1979). Culture and Social Anthropology. New Delhi: McGraw Hill Publishing Co.

Course Title: GENDER STUDIES
Course Code: RS-508
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

This course aims at providing basic concepts about gender. The historical movements and feminist perspectives about gender shall be given. The course will provide understanding about globalization and its role towards changing gender relation in various societies around the world. Special emphasis shall be given to Muslim and Pakistani societies. Specific areas of gender discrimination (both for men and women) will also be learnt.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • Definition, concepts and Importance
    • Women’s lives and Sociological Perspectives
    • Feminism and Masculism
    • Gender and Social Institutions
  2. Gender and Socialization
    • Agencies of Socialization
    • Learning Process: Identification Theory, Social Learning Theory, Cognitive Development Theory
  3. Gender Issues in Pakistan
    • Higher education and Gender
    • Women and Health
    • Violence against women
    • Gender and Media
    • Gender and Environment
  4. Gender and Inequality
    • Property Rights
    • Employment
    • Politics
    • Women and Law in Pakistan
  5. Women and Development
    • Women’s Day
    • Women’s and Multimedia
    • Women and Rural Development
    • The Administrative Wing
    • Nikahanama
  6. Changing Role of Women
    • Changing role of urban women
    • Changing role of Rural women

Practical

The students will be required to visit villages to study agricultural society’s gender point of view and to understand the cultural life. In addition, students will be asked to submit a report on gender role with their major problems needs to be addressed at provincial and national level.

Recommanded Books

  1. Beauvoir, Simone De (2007), The second Sex, Vintage.
  2. Butler, Judith (2004), Undoing Gender, Routledge.
  3. Butler; Judith (2006), Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity, Routledge.
  4. Jane Pilcher, (2008) 50 Key Concepts in Gender Studies, Sage Publication New Delhi
  5. Jasmin Mirza. 2002. Between Chadar and the Market. Oxford University Press. Karachi.
  6. Johan Z Spade, (2008) The Kaleidoscope of Gender, Sage Publication New Delhi;
  7. Kapadia, K. (2002). The Violence of Development. London, Zed Books.
  8. Kathy Davis, Mary S Evans and Judith Lorber, (2008) Handbook of Gender and Women’s Studies Sage Publication
  9. Mary Holmes, (2008) What is Gender? (Sociological Approaches) Sage Publication New Delhi;
  10. Mead, Margaret (2001), Male and Female, Harper Perennial.
  11. Radtke, H.Lorraine and Henderikus J. Stam 1994-95. Power and Gender.Sage Publication, London.
  12. Ronnie Vernooy (2008) Social and Gender Analysis in Natural Resource Management, Sage Publication New Delhi;

Course Title: PAKISTANI SOCIETY AND CULTURE
Course Code: RS-512
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

The course aims to make students learn about the nature and structure of Pakistani society. It aims to impart knowledge about national culture and sub-cultures of Pakistan. The course will develop understanding about the integrated function of various social institutions in the country.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • Definition of Society
    • Characteristics of Pakistani Society
    • Social Stratification, Cast, Class and Ethnicity
    • Social Institutions in Pakistan
      • Family
      • Religion
      • Economy
      • Politics
      • Education
      • Recreational
  2. Educational Dynamics
    • Illiteracy
    • Literacy
    • Universal Primary Education Concept
    • Schools; Technical and Higher Education
    • Status of Formal and Informal Education
  3. Historical Perspective of Pakistani Culture
    • Provincial Culture
    • Culture of Punjab
    • Culture of Sindh
    • Culture of KPK
    • Culture of Balochistan
    • Culture of Kashmir and Northern Areas
  4. Urban and Rural Division of Pakistan
    • Rural Society
    • Urban Society
    • Rural Power Structure
  5. Minority and Their Belief
  6. Major Social Problems
  7. Major Occupation and Production Activities

Practical

Students need to visit rural areas to understand their culture and social life in their natural settings and report their major social problems to the concerned teacher in black and white.

Recommanded Books

  1. Churchill Winston 1898. The Story of the Malakand Field Force. Leo Cooper and Octopus Publishing Groups (2002) plc, London. pp.51-72.
  2. Dupree. L. 1980. Afghanistan. Princeton University Press. p.126.
  3. Lindholm C. 1996. Frontier Perspective: Essay in Comparative Anthropology. Karachi: Oxford University Press. p.196.
  4. Mumtaz K. 1987. Women of Pakistan in Readings on Women in Pakistan. John Murray. London. p .7.
  5. Mumtaz K. and Farida S. 1987. Women of Pakistan, Two Steps Forward One Step Back. Vanguard. p.54-90.
  6. Shaheed, F. and. Mumtaz K. 1990. Women’s Participation in Pakistan. Shaheed, F. et al. 1998. Women in Politics: Participation and Representation in Pakistan. Shirkat Gah, Pakistan. p.365.
  7. Aisha L. F. Shaheed 2004. Great ancestors: women asserting rights in Muslim contexts: information and training kit. Lahore, Pakistan: Shirkat Gah.
  8. Zia S and Bari F. 1999. Women’s Political Participation in Pakistan Unpublished Report.

Forth Year 1st Semester

Course Title: SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY & ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
Course Code: RS-601
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives (SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY)

The course aims at familiarizing the students with the historical emergence, concepts, methods and theories of social psychology. It also focuses on highlighting the impact of culture on the personality development. The course would enable the students to conceptualize the dynamics and structure of social self.

Course Objectives (ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR)

The course of organizational behaviour has been framed with such objectives that the student of sociology are very much concern about behaviour, attitudes, social learning, motivation, leadership and even group life. The present course will enhance the capacity of the students to understand such concepts in the view of the organizational structure for better management. Further, such knowledge will provide them prompt chances of better organization and leadership for proper and correct judgment and decision making.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • Definition and scope of social psychology
    • Historical development of social psychology
    • Methods and framework of social psychology
    • What is Organizational Behaviour
    • Importance of organizational behaviour
    • Foundations of Individual Behaviour:
    • Biographical Characteristics, Ability, Learning
    • Organizational behaviour from Islamic and indigenous perspective
    • Understanding human psychology through the lenses of Quran and Sunnah
  2. Human Behaviour and Personality
    • Psychological dynamics
    • Socio-cultural dynamics
    • Man as a psycho-bio-social unit
    • Personality Development
    • Socialization and personality development
    • Theories of personality development
    • Attitudes, perception and decision in organization behaviour
      • Attitudes and Job Satisfaction
      • Types of attitudes
      • Types of behaviours
      • Perception and Individual Decision Making
      • Why perception is important
      • Types of decision making
      • Biases and errors in decision making
    • Motivation concepts
      • Content theories of Motivational
      • Process theories of motivation
      • Motivation: from concept to application
      • Applying motivation concepts for designing reward system
      • Emotions and Moods
    • Theorists
      • Sigmund Freud; C.H. Cooley; B. F. Skinner; G. H. Mead
    • Cultural and Social Development
      • Universal cultural patterns
      • Cultural values and inter-personal adjustment
    • Individual in Society
      • Interpersonal behaviour
      • Attitudes (meaning, formation, and change) perception
      • Language (communication and change) motivation
    • Psycho-social problems of Pakistani Society

Practical

Students are required to arrange and manage students’ level program to understand social psychology. However, students are also required to conduct a survey at University level to collect data related to Organizational Behaviour and submit a comprehensive research report.

Recommanded Books

  1. Allport, G. W (1985). "The historical background of social psychology". In Lindzey, G; Aronson, E. The Handbook of Social Psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  2. Moscovici, S; Markova, I (2006). The Making of Modern Social Psychology. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.
  3. Sison, Erick Louie. A (2008). The dynamics of persuasion. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  4. Bem, D (1970). Beliefs, attitudes, and human affairs. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.
  5. Kassin, Saul; Fein, Steven; Markus, Hazel Rose (2008). Social Psychology (7 ed.). Boston, NY: Houghton Mifflin Company. ISBN 0-618-86846-1.
  6. Moskowitz, Gordon B (2005). Social Cognition: Understanding Self and Others. Texts in Social Psychology. Guilford. ISBN 978-1-59385-085-2..
  7. Aronson, Elliot; Wilson, Timothy D; Akert, Robin M (2010). Social Psychology (7 ed.). Prentice Hall.
  8. David G. Myers (2007). Psychology (8 ed.). Wordsworth.
  9. Aronson, Elliot (2008). The Social Animal (10 ed.). Wordsworth.
  10. Cialdini, R.B (2000). Influence: Science and Practice. Allyn and Bacon.
  11. Forsyth, D.R (2006). Group dynamics. Belmont, CA: Thomson-Wadworth.
  12. Tajfel, H; Turner, J.C (1986). "The social identity theory of intergroup behaviour". In Worchel, S; Austin, W.G. Psychology of Intergroup Relations. Chicago, Illinois: Nelson-Hall.
  13. Anderson, Craig (2003). The Sage Handbook of Social Psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  14. Batson, C.D (1998). "Altruism and prosocial behaviour". In Gilbert, D.T; Fiske, S.T; Lindzey, G. The Handbook of Social Psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  15. Milgram, Stanley (1975). Obedience to authority. Harper and Bros.
  16. Forgas, Joseph P, ed. (1981). Social Cognition: Perspectives on Everyday Understanding. European Monographs in Social Psychology. 26. London and New York: Academic Press. ISBN 0-12-263562-0
  17. Greenwood, John D (1991). Relations and Representations: An introduction to the philosophy of social psychological science. London and New York: Routledge. ISBN 0-415-05515-6
  18. Levine, Robert, et al. (editors), "Journeys in Social Psychology: Looking Back to Inspire the Future", CRC Press, 2008. ISBN 0-8058-6134-3
  19. Augustine, Brannigan (2004). The Rise and Fall of Social Psychology: The Use and Misuse of the Experimental Method. Aldine Transaction. ISBN 978-0-202-30742-8.
  20. Krech, David; Crutchfield, Richard S.1948. The structure and function of social groups
  21. John D. DeLamater, Daniel J. Myers. 2010. Social Psychology. Publisher Cengage Learning. ISBN 0495812978, 9780495812975
  22. Sherif, C. 1976. Orientation in Social Psychology, New York: Harper and Row. P.375.
  23. Weber, M. 1946: Essay in Sociology. The Social Psychology of the World Religion. In H.H. Gerth and C.W. Mills (eds.). New York: Oxford University Press: p.323-359.
  24. Strati, A. (1999) Organization and Aesthetics. London: Sage
  25. Baron, Robert A., and Greenberg, Jerald. Behaviour in organizations – 9th edition. Pearson Education Inc., New Jersey: 2008.
  26. Hatch, M.J. (2006), "Organization Theory: Modern, symbolic, and postmodern perspectives." 2nd Ed. Oxford University Press ISBN 0-19-926021-4.
  27. Jones, Ishmael (2008) , The Human Factor: Inside the CIA's Dysfunctional Intelligence Culture. New York: Encounter Books ISBN 978-1-59403-382-7.
  28. Robbins, Stephen P. (2004) Organizational Behaviour - Concepts, Controversies, Applications. 4th Ed. Prentice Hall ISBN 0-13-170901-1.
  29. Robbins, S. P. (2003). Organizational behaviour: global and Southern African perspectives. Cape Town, Pearson Education South Africa.
  30. Scott, W. Richard (2007). Organizations and Organizing: Rational, Natural, and Open Systems Perspectives. Pearson Prentice Hall ISBN 0-13-195893-3.
  31. Weick, Karl E (1979). The Social Psychology of Organizing 2nd Ed. McGraw-Hill ISBN 0-07-554808-9.
  32. Tompkins, Jonathan R. (2005) "Organization Theory and Public Management". Thompson Wadsworth ISBN 978-0-534-17468-2
  33. Kanigel, R. (1997). The One Best Way, Frederick Winslow Taylor and the Enigma of Efficiency. London: Brown and Co.

Course Title: INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY
Course Code: RS-603
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

The course will provide familiarity about the basic concepts, theories and process of industrial sociology.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction Meaning and Definition
    • Industry and Society
    • Industry and Social Stratification
    • Work, Occupation, Industry, Organization, Factory and Management
  2. Industrialization
    • Social Theory of Productive System
    • Antecedent of Industrialization in west
  3. Theories of Industrialization
  4. Formal Organization
    • Bureaucracy
    • Organizational Charts (Structure)
    • Trade Union, and theories of Unionism
  5. Work Ethics in Islam
    • Division of Labor
    • Work Ethics
    • Distribution of Wealth
  6. Industrialization in Pakistan
    • Historical view of Industrial Development
    • Problems and Prospects of Industrialization in Sociological Perspective
    • Industrial Relationship in Pakistan
  7. Trade Unionism in Pakistan
    • Labor Movement
    • Trade Unionism
    • Union Leadership and Collective Bargaining
  8. Labour Policies in Pakistan
    • Historical Perspective and Social Change
    • Analysis of Wages

Practical

The students will visit different industries to study human relations in industry. They will meet the employer and employees to discuss their problems and submit a comprehensive report.

Recommanded Books

  1. Hall, R.H., (1995) Organization: Structure, Process and Outcomes, prentice Hall, California.
  2. Health, Christian, luff Pual (2000) Technology in action Cambridge University Press.
  3. Theobland. (1994). Understanding Industrial Society: A Sociological Guide. St. Merton Press, New York.
  4. Stanley R. P., (1981). The Sociology of Industry. Rutledge. USA
  5. Braverman, H., (1982). Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation Of Work In The Twentieth Century . Monthly Review Press, New York
  6. Ritzer G., (2011). The McDonaldization of society 6, Sage Publications

Course Title: NGO & PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Course Code: RS-605
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives (NGO MANAGEMENT)

The main objectives of present course are to understand the role of NGOs in socio-economic development across the globe. But more specifically we will discuss the cases from Pakistan. In this class we will underline why we need NGOs and how effective this network is? On other hand we will also evaluate the developmental performances of different NGOs in Pakistan.

Course Objectives (PROJECT MANAGEMENT)

The course acquaints the students with the basic concepts of project cycle, cause and effect relationship, logical framework, planning and management. Required skills of field formation, preparation of different reports and techniques for the development of project will be studied. It will also equip students with the tools of monitoring, evaluation and impact assessment.

Course Contents:

  1. Strategic management of NGOs
    • Management of NGOs, NGOs and social change
    • Definition, need, identification, selection and scope of the project
    • Characteristics of project, types of project
    • Project cycle
    • Cause and effect diagram
    • Project objectives
  2. Involvement of NGO
    • Role of NGOs in global civil society
    • Regulations to corporations, Government NGO co-operation, NGOs in planning and development
    • Role of Global Governance in NGO Management
    • NGOs advocates of good governance
  3. Project Planning
    • Development indicators
    • Preparing Project Proposal
    • Logical framework analysis
    • Key components of project
    • Potential problem analysis
    • Fields force formation strategy
  4. Financing NGOs
    • Risks of bank-NGO relations, Funding NGOs, Role of IMF, Financial and technical activities of IMF
  5. Project Organizing
    • Organization of resources
    • Task allocation, role Taking,
    • Coordination in project team,
    • Accountability within project
    • Conflict resolution
    • Time management
    • Liaison with external agencies
    • Preparation of technical progress reports
    • Preparation of financial progress reports
    • Writing of minutes and reports of project meetings.
  6. Project Monitoring and Evaluation
    • Checking deviation and progress monitoring
    • Follow-up, managing deviation
    • Definition and difference between MandE
    • Need for evaluation
    • Steps in evaluation, collecting necessary data, expanding logframe matrix for evaluation, checking deviation, adjusting deviation
  7. Impact assessment
    • Definition concepts and meaning
    • Types of impact assessment
      • Social impact Assessment
      • Economic Impact Assessment
      • Physical Impact Assessment
      • Environmental Impact Assessment
    • Methods and techniques of Impact Assessment

Practical

Department will arrange visits to different NGOs/CBOs to understand its management style. And, exercises on project preparation, use of CPM/PERT methods, LFA exercise, monitoring and evaluation exercise.

Recommanded Books

  1. Goel, O.P. (2004) Strategic Management and policy issues of NGOs
  2. Blank. 2000. The natural laws of leadership. Royal book company, Karachi
  3. Khan, Imdad. A. 1998. Changing pattern of rural leadership and their characteristics. Pakistan academy for rural development, Peshawar, Pakistan
  4. Qureshi, Zafar Iqbal.(Ed) 2005. Managing NGOs in Developing Countries. Oxford University Press. Karachi. (5 Volumes)
  5. Richard H. Thayer, Edward Yourdon (2000). Software Engineering Project Management (2nd Ed.). Wiley-IEEE Computer Society Press. ISBN 0-8186-8000-8.
  6. Fleming, Quentin (2005). Earned Value Project Management (Third Edition ed.). Project Management Institute. ISBN 1-930699-89-1.
  7. Nokes, Sebastian. (2007). The Definitive Guide to Project Management. 2nd Ed.n. London (Financial Times / Prentice Hall):ISBN 978-0-273-71097-4
  8. Paul C. Dinsmore et al (2005). The right projects done right! John Wiley and Sons, ISBN 0-7879-7113-8. p.35 and further.
  9. Lewis R. Ireland (2006). Project Management. McGraw-Hill Professional, ISBN 0-07-147160-X.
  10. Joseph Phillips (2003). PMP Project Management Professional Study Guide. McGraw-Hill Professional, ISBN 0-07-223062-2
  11. Dennis Lock (2007) Project Management (9th ed.) Gower Publishing, Ltd., ISBN 0-566-08772-3
  12. Young-Hoon Kwak (2005). A brief History of Project Management. In: The story of managing projects. Elias G. Carayannis et al. (9th eds), Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 1-56720-506-2
  13. David I. Cleland, Roland Gareis (2006). Global Project Management Handbook. "Chapter 1: "The evolution of project management". McGraw-Hill Professional. ISBN 0-07-146045-4
  14. Martin Stevens (2002). Project Management Pathways. Association for Project Management. APM Publishing Limited. ISBN 1-903494-01-X
  15. Morgen Witzel (2003). Fifty key figures in management. Routledge, ISBN 0-415-36977-0.
  16. David I. Cleland, Roland Gareis (2006). Global Project Management Handbook. McGraw-Hill Professional. ISBN 0-07-146045-4.
  17. Bjarne Kousholt (2007). Project Management –. Theory and practice.. Nyt Teknisk Forlag. ISBN 87-571-2603-8..

Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO POPULATION STUDIES
Course Code: RS-607
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

The course provides students with the sociological insight of education. Core concepts, levels, educational institutions, theories, educational policies and reforms will be studied. Relationship of education with socio-economic development will also be discussed.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • The Concept of Education
    • Origin and Development of Education
    • Forms of Education, Formal, In-formal
    • Contemporary Education System
  2. Sociological Theory and Education
    • Education and Socialization
    • Social Stratification and Education
  3. Roles of Education
    • Education and Social Mobility
    • Functions of Education
    • Education and Democracy
    • Education for Leadership
  4. School as an Organization
    • Definitions and Theoretical Models
    • Bureaucratization and Professionalization of Schooling
  5. The Sociology of School as an Agent of Change
    • The Social Construction of Curriculum
    • Education and Development
    • School Management Committees
    • Role of Community in Education
  6. Relationship between Education and the Economy
    • Reconstructions Views of Education and Economic Development
    • Manpower Planning
    • Demand and Supply of Educational Institutions in Developing Countries
  7. Education and other social institutions
    • Teacher-Student Relationship
    • Education Policy and Reforms
    • Private and Public Sectors of Education
    • Educational Problems
    • Quality of Education
    • Investment in Education
    • Status of Education in Pakistan

    Practical

    Students have to submit a comprehensive report on prevailing various educational system and structure in Pakistan. Suggest few recommendations for the betterment of educational level.

    Recommanded Books

    1. Ballantine, Jeanne H. (1993), The Sociology of Education. A Systematic Analysis. New Gercy Prentice Hall.
    2. Banks, Olive (1971). The Sociology of Education. London: B. T. Batsford Ltd.
    3. Best, John W. (1992). Research in Education. New Delhi: Prentice Hall.
    4. Brubacher, L.S. (1970). Modern Philosophies of Education. New Delhi: McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. Ltd.
    5. Cosin, B.R. and others (latest ed.). School and Society: A Sociological Reader. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
    6. Dale, R.G. Eland and M. MacDonald (1976). Schooling and Capitalism. London: Routledge and Keg a Paul.
    7. David Levinson, Peter W. Cookson, Alan R. Sadovnik. 2002. Education and Sociology: An Encyclopedia‎
    8. Evetts, J. The Sociology of Educational Ideas. London: Rutledge and Kegan Paul.
    9. Hirst, P.H. and R.S. Peter (1970). The Logic of Education. London: Routledge and Keg and Paul.
    10. Ottaway, Andrew Kenneth Cosway. 2003. Education and Society: International Library of Sociology‎
    11. Torres, Carlos Alberto, Ari Antikainen. 2002. The International Handbook on the Sociology of Education: An International.‎

Course Title: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Course Code: RS-611
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

Human resource management has been included as a subject to provide necessary guidance and information to the students of sociology about human resources and particularly their management. The course will equip the students to plan, manage and then make a policy for the better utilization of human resources. Besides, the course focuses on the various HRM practices both at local and international level which will enhance the capacity of the students of sociology in terms of selection, utilization of resources for social welfare needs.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • Meaning and Definition
    • Importance of HRM
    • Essentials of HRM
    • Planning, Organizing, Leading and Controlling
    • Emerging Human resource management challenges
    • Trends in HRM
    • Global vs. local HRM practices
    • Basic Islamic philosophy of managing human resource
  2. Conducting Job analysis
    • HR Planning, Job Description and Job Specification
  3. Staffing
    • Recruiting and selecting employees
    • Recruitment techniques
    • Sources of recruitment
    • Selection tests and Interviewing techniques
  4. Employee development
    • Performance appraisals
    • Performance management
    • Training and development
    • Training the employees
    • Types of training
    • Technique of training
    • Developing careers
    • Career growth
    • Project Description and discussion
  5. Compensations
    • Managing compensation
    • Types of compensation
    • Rewarding performance
    • Pay for Performance
    • Types of benefits
    • Employee relations

    Practical

    The students will be required to exercise on job description, recruitment, performance, satisfaction and development of employees.

    Recommanded Books

    1. Wilson, J. P. * Wilson, J. Swanson, R. A. and Holton, E. F. 2009. Foundations of Human Resource Development (2nd Edition). Berrett-Koehler Publishers.
    2. Werner, J. M. & DeSimone, R. L. 2008. Human Resource Development (5th Edition). South-Western College Pub.
    3. P. 2005. Human Resource Development: Learning and Training for Individuals and Organizations. Kogan Page Publishers.
    4. Dahama, O.P. 2002. Designing of Training for Extension and Rural Welfare, Ram Prasad and Sons publishers, India.
    5. Mack, M., and Waldman, M. 2002. Recasting Retirement. San Francisco, CA: Civic Ventures and Philadelphia, PA: USA
    6. Woods, J. and Cortada, J.W. 2001. ASTD Training and Performance Workbook. NY: McGraw-Hill. New York. USA.
    7. Blank. 2000. The Natural Laws of Leadership. Royal book Company, Karachi.
    8. Khan, I.A. 1998. Changing Pattern of Rural Leadership and Their Characteristics. Pakistan Academy for Rural Development, Peshawar, Pak.
    9. Nadler L Ed. (1984). The Handbook of Human Resources Development, John Wiley and Sons, New York.
    10. Merkle, Judith A.. Management and Ideology. University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-03737-5.

Forth Year 2nd Semester

Course Title: CONFLICT RESOLUTION
Course Code: RS-602
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

This course will identify a range of conflict resolution approaches with special focus on negotiation, mediation, and advocacy. It will enable the students to study models of social work practice radical, ecological, systems, generalist, and problem-solving approaches. The course will help the students to explore the theoretical basis for a conflict resolution approaches and techniques.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • Review of Judicial System
    • Court structure and subject matter jurisdiction
    • Progress of a case through the system
    • Analysis of benefits and detriments of the judicial system
    • Alternative Dispute Resolution Mechanisms
    • Client/attorney perspectives
    • Advantages and disadvantages
    • General types of ADR defined
  2. Hybrid Process
    • Mediation/Arbitration
    • Summary Jury Trials
    • Minitrials
    • Early Neutral Evaluation
    • Special Masters
  3. Mediation and Its Training
    • Introduction and Goals
    • Conflicts: causes and responses
    • Elements of Mediation
    • Issue identification and Prioritizing
    • Timing and climate setting
    • Forms and Functions
    • Skills Training
    • Philosophical and Ethical Issues
  4. Arbitration
    • The Process, the Participants, the Neutrals and the Authority
    • Arbitration Act
    • Substantive Areas of Law Where Applied: Labor and Employment, Automobile, Construction, Business Insurance, Securities, etc.
  5. Role of the Mediator
    • Objectives before and during the mediation process
    • Reducing defensive communication
    • Essential qualities necessary
    • Common errors
    • Role play
  6. Conducting a Mediation Session
    • Case preparation
    • Opening statements to parties
    • Explanation of process and role of mediator
    • Ground rules
    • Confidentiality
    • Role play
  7. Common Problem Areas
    • Dealing with impasse
    • Summarizing issues
    • Hostile parties
    • Manipulative parties
    • Social service needs and referrals
    • Role play
  8. Negotiation
    • The Process and Outcome of Negotiation
    • Tactics, Techniques and Skills of Negotiation
    • Ethical Issues in Negotiation
    • Application: from Individual Use in Business to Courtroom Tactics
    • Service Learning Component: District Court

Practical

The students will be required to visit rural communities and discuss conflict issues and suggest various tools to resolve those issues.

Recommanded Books

  1. Bernadine Van Gramberg, 2005. Managing Workplace Conflict: Alternative Dispute Resolution in Australia‎
  2. Craig E. Runde, Tim A. Flanagan. 2006. Becoming a Conflict Competent Leader: How You and Your Organization Can ....
  3. De Dreu, Michele J Gelfand Published Dec, 2007
  4. Kent M. Weeks, 1999. Managing Campus Conflict Through Alternative Dispute Resolution‎
  5. Laurie S. Coltri. 2003. Conflict Diagnosis and Alternative Dispute Resolution‎
  6. The Psychology Conflict Management and Conflict in Organizations Carsten K.W.
  7. Tidwell A.C. (2001). Conflict Resolved? A critical Assessment of Conflict Resolution. Continuum International Publishing Group. London. New York.
  8. Stewart S. (1998). Conflict Resolution: A Foundation Guide. Waterside Press. Winchester.
  9. James A. Schellenberg (1996). Conflict Resolution: Theory, Research and Practice. State University of New York Press.
  10. Rams Botham O., WoodHouse T., Miall H. (2011). Contemporary Conflict Resolution. (3rd edition). Polity Press.
  11. Wandberg R. (2005) Conflict Resolution: Communication, Cooperation, Compromise. Capstone U.S.A.
  12. Doak Robin S. (2003). Conflict Resolution. Raintree Press.

Course Title: CRIMINOLOGY
Course Code: RS-604
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

This course familiarizes the students with the basic concepts, theories and methodologies used in the field of criminology. The role of pertinent agencies in crime control will be learnt. The course will focus on understanding crime, criminality, and social remedies.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • Definition of crime
    • Criminology and its scope
    • Criminology and criminal law
  2. Crime and Society
    • Causes of crime
    • Impacts of crimes on Social Institutions
    • Crime as a social problem
    • Remedies
  3. Juvenile Delinquency
    • Introduction
    • Causes of juvenile delinquency
    • Types of juvenile delinquents
    • Crime prevention at juvenile level in Pakistan
    • Juvenile court
    • Juvenile reformatories
  4. Punishment
    • Introduction
    • Purpose of punishment
    • Types of punishment
    • A-Death penalty
    • B-Imprisonment
    • Prison and related problems
    • Islamic concept of punishment
  5. Classification of Criminals
    • Legalistic criminals
    • Moralistic criminals
    • Psychopathic criminals
    • Institutional criminal
    • Situational criminals
    • Habitual criminals
    • Occupational criminals
    • Organized criminals
  6. Theories and Approaches to Criminal Behavior
    • Cesare Lombroso theory of Biological foundation
    • Sociological theory or Sutherland Differential Association theory
    • Psychological and psychiatric theories of criminal behavior
  7. Crime Detection Agencies in Pakistan
    • FIA, CIA, IB, ISI
    • Techniques of crime detection
    • Problems in crime detection
  8. Rehabilitation of Offenders/Criminals
    • Parole
    • Probation

Practical

The students will be required to visit various related departments like, judiciary, jails, police department, criminology Department of Sindh University or to invite a resource person to understand criminal process with their remedial steps and submit a report to the concerned teacher.

Recommanded Books

  1. Larry J. Siegel (2012). Criminology: Theories, Patterns & Typologies (11th Ed
  2. Ed). Cengage Learning, 2012. ISBN: 1133049648, 9781133049647.
  3. Larry J. Siegel (2009). Criminology: The Core (10th Ed). Thompson and Wordsworth Inc.
  4. Schmalleger. F. (1998).Criminology Today: An Integrative Introduction. Prentice Hall . ISBN: 0138482683, 9780138482688.
  5. Samaha, J. (2010). Criminal Law. Cengage Learning Publisher. ISBN: 0495812358, 9780495812357.
  6. Larry K. Gaines, Roger LeRoy Miller, Larry K. Gaines (2008). Criminal Justice in Action: The Core. (5th edition revised). Cengage Learning Publishers. ISBN: 0495601608, 9780495601609.
  7. Larry J. Siegel and Brandon C. Welsh .(2010). Juvenile Delinquency. The Core (4th Editin). Cengage Learning Publisher. ISBN0495809861, 9780495809869:
  8. Carey Hames (1978). An Introduction to Criminology. New Jersey, Prentice Hall.
  9. Cavan Ruth Shoule. (1956). Criminology. New York, Thomas Yacrowall, Company.
  10. Block Harbertt A Gilber Gies Man (1992). Crime And Society, New York, Random House.
  11. Khalid.M. (----). Principles Of Criminology. New York. J.B. Lipoincott Company Donald, R. Gessey
  12. Criminology Today,New Jersey , Prentice Hall, 1999.
  13. Khalid. M. (2001). Social Work, Theory and Practice, Kifayat Academy, Karachi.
  14. Deflem, Mathieu (2006). Sociological Theory and Criminological Research: Views from Europe and the United States. Elsevier. ISBN0-7623-1322-6.
  15. Beccaria, Cesare (1764). Richard Davies, translator. ed. On Crimes and Punishments, and Other Writings. Cambridge University. ISBN0-521-40203-4.
  16. Siegel, Larry J. (2003). Criminology, 8th edition. Thomson-Wadsworth.
  17. McLennan, Gregor, Jennie Pawson, Mike Fitzgerald (1980). Crime and Society: Readings in History and Theory. Routledge. ISBN0-415-02755-1.
  18. Hayward, Keith J. (2004). City Limits: Crime, Consumerism and the Urban Experience. Routledge. ISBN1-904385-03-6.
  19. Garland, David (2002). Of Crimes and Criminals. In Maguire, Mike, Rod Morgan, Robert Reiner. The Oxford Handbook of Criminology, 3rd edition. Oxford University.
  20. Hester, S., Eglin, P. (1992). A Sociology of Crime, London, Routledge.
  21. Shaw, Clifford R. and McKay, Henry D. (1942). Juvenile Delinquency and Urban Areas. The University of Chicago Press. ISBN0-226-75125-2.
  22. Bursik Jr., Robert J. (1988). Social Disorganization and Theories of Crime and Delinquency: Problems and Prospects". Criminology26 (4): p. 519–539. doi:10.1111/j.1745-9125.1988.tb00854.x.
  23. Merton, Robert (1957). Social Theory and Social Structure. Free Press. ISBN0-02-921130-1.
  24. Cohen, Albert (1955). Delinquent Boys. Free Press. ISBN0-02-905770-1.
  25. Kornhauser, R. (1978). Social Sources of Delinquency. University of Chicago Press. ISBN0-226-45113-5.
  26. Cloward, Richard, Lloyd Ohlin (1960). Delinquency and Opportunity. Free Press. ISBN0-02-905590-3.
  27. Hirschi, Travis (1969). Causes of Delinquency. Transaction Publishers. ISBN0-7658-0900-1.
  28. Gottfredson, M., T. Hirschi (1990). A General Theory of Crime. Stanford University Press.
  29. Ferrell, J., Hayward, K., Morrison, W. and Presdee, M. (2004) Cultural Criminology Unleashed, London: Glasshouse Press
  30. Katz, J. (1988), The Seductions of Crime, New York: Basic Books
  31. Presdee, M. (2000), Cultural Criminology and the Carnival of Crime, London: Routledge
  32. Reiner, R. (2007) Law and Order, Cambridge: Polity
  33. Young, J. (1999), The Exclusive Society, London: Sage
  34. Hall, S., Winlow, S. and Ancrum, C. (2008) Criminal Identities and Consumer Culture, London: Willan/Routledge
  35. Felson, Marcus (1994). Crime and Everyday Life. Pine Forge. ISBN0-8039-9029-4.
  36. Hillyard, P., Pantazis, C., Tombs, S., & Gordon, D. (2004). Beyond Criminology: Taking Harm Seriously. London: Pluto
  37. Barak-Glantz, I.L., E.H. Johnson (1983). Comparative criminology. Sage Publication.
  38. Barak, Gregg (ed.). (1998). Integrative criminology (International Library of Criminology, Criminal Justice & Penology.). Aldershot: Ashgate/Dartmouth. ISBN 1-84014-008-9

Course Title: RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES
Course Code: RS-606
Course Credit Hours: 3(2+1)
Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

The course aims to learn about the basic concepts of social research, various research methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative. The students will learn about the usage of various methodologies while conducting research on different topics. The main tools and research techniques will be studied. It is assumed that the students have a background in basic social statistics and in social theories. The students will also learn about certain specific computer software like SPSS, NUDIST and Ethnograph.

Course Contents:

  1. Introduction
    • Definition and Meanings of Social Research
    • Characteristics of Scientific Social Research
    • Theory and Research
    • Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods - An Introduction
    • Qualities of Good Researcher
  2. Steps in Social Research
    • Choosing the Problem and its Significance
    • Review of Relevant Literature
    • Justification of Topic
    • Formulation of Objectives
    • Research Questions and Research Hypothesis
    • Theoretical Framework: Inductive and Deductive Ways of Theorizing
    • Conceptualizations and Operationalization
    • Data Collection
    • Data Analysis and Interpretation
    • Report Writing
  3. Dimensions of Social Research
    • Use of Research
    • Basic Research
    • Applied Research: Evaluation, Actions, Social Impact
    • Purpose of Social Research: Exploratory, Descriptive, Explanatory
    • Time Dimension in Social Research: Cross Sectional and Longitudinal Studies
    • Data Collection and Analysis Techniques: Quantitative Data and Qualitative Data
  4. Philosophical and Methodological Foundations of Social Research
    • Meanings of Methodology and Methods in Social Research
    • Ontology and Epistemology
    • Positivist Social Research
    • Interpretive Social Research
    • Critical Social Research
    • Feminist and Postmodern Social Research
  5. The Literature Review
    • Significance and Purpose of Literature Review
    • Theoretical and Empirical Literature
    • Ways to Do Literature Review
  6. Ethical Considerations in Social Research
    • Meanings of Being Ethical in Social Research
    • Informed Consent and Use of Deception
    • Confidentiality and Anonymity
    • Privacy
    • Data Security
    • Power Relations between Researcher and Researched
  7. Academic Writing
    • Meanings of Academic Writing?
    • Analytical and Critical Approach in Academic Writing
    • Ability to Synthesis Information
    • Constructing a Line of Reasoning and Ability to Develop Counter Arguments
    • Use of Credible and Latest Academic/scholarly Sources
    • Literature Citing, References, and Bibliography
    • Quoting
    • Plagiarism
    • Footnotes and Endnotes
    • Composing and Formatting of Reports
    • Graphic and Pictorial Presentation
    • Proof Reading

Practical

The students will be required to propose a research activity based on scientific measures.

Recommanded Books

  1. Alwin, Duene F. 2007. Margins of Error; A Study of Reliability in Survey Measurements. U.S.A. : John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  2. Babbie, Earl. 2004. The Practice of Social Research. 10th Edition. Belmont: CA Words Worth Publishing.
  3. Bridge Semekh & Culhy. 2005. Research Methods in the Social Science. New Delhi: Vistaar Publisher.
  4. Christopher Winship, 2003, Sociological Methods and Research. London: Sage Publications.
  5. Monette, Duane R., Sullivan, Thomas J. and Dejong, Cornell R. 1998 Applied Social Research: Tool for the Human Services (4th Edition) New York: Harcout Brace College Publishers.
  6. Nachimas, Chava Frankfort and David Nachmias (1997) Research Methods in the Social Sciences (5th Edition) New York: St. Martin’s Press Inc.
  7. Neuman William Lawerance. (2000) Social Research Methods 4thed. Allyn and Eacon., Boston.
  8. Somekh & Lewin, 2005, Research methods in Social Sciences, Vistaar, Publication, New Delhi.
  9. Neuman, W. Lawrence (2000). “Social Research Methods”. New York: Allyn and Bacon.
  10. Baker, Therese L. (1989). “Doing Social Research”. McGraw Hill.
  11. Babbie, Earl (2005). “The Practice of Social Research”. Belmont, California: Wordsworth.
  12. Juliet Corbin & Anselm C Strauss, Basics of Qualitative Research 3rd Edition) (2008) Sage Publications New Delhi

Course Title: Internship and Report Writing
Course Code: RS-610
Course Credit Hours: 4(0+4)
Prerequisites: None

Practical

Students will be required to undertake internship at various agricultural research organizations, private companies, extension/adaptive/private farms.

Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data.

Upon completion of internship / research project, students are required to submit a report and give presentation of internship/research experiment

Recommanded Books

  1. Andrew, C. O. and Hildebrand, P. E. (1993). “Applied Agriculture Research: Foundations and Methodology.” Western Press.
  2. Hasmi, N. (1989). “Style Mannual of Technical Writtings.” USAID/NARC, Islamabad.
  3. Gimbaled, J. and Acuter, W. S. (1988). “MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers.” The Modern Language Association of America.
  4. Little, T. M. and Hills, F. J. (1978). “Agricultural Experimentation.” John Wiley and Sons, New York.
  5. Khalil, S.K. and P. Shah. 2007. Scientific Writing and Presentation. Higher Education Commission, Islamabad, Pakistan.
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